Category: Dordogne

Dordogne's Plus Beaux Villages

Dordogne’s Plus Beaux Villages: Beynac-et-Cazenac and Castlenaud-la-Chapelle

Recently I challenged myself to visit all the “Plus Beaux Villages de France” — France’s most beautiful villages. Perhaps I should have done a bit more research before making such a statement. There are 156 official villages with the “Plus Beaux” distinction. Even though France is only the size of Texas, it’s a big place!

Dordogne's Plus Beaux Villages

Now that I’m a bit more realistic about the “task” (albeit, a pleasure) it’s more feasible for me to do one region at a time.

Plus Beaux Villages by Region

There are 13 regions in France. The region where I’ve visited the most beaux villages in Aquitaine. It’s also where there are the most “official” Plus Beaux Villages in France — in Dordogne.

 Dordogne’s Plus Beaux Villages

Three years ago a hometown friend that I hadn’t seen in 40 years came to visit me in France. While here we entertained ourselves by driving from Uzès to Dordogne. Like typical tourists we focused on the area around the Dordogne river: the “classic” Dordogne: picturesque villages, medieval castles, limestone cliffs and caves with prehistoric drawings. The French call it “le Pèrigord.”

During our week-long tour we stopped at two of the most well known beaux villages in Dordogne — Domme and La Roque-Gageac. To learn about these villages read on here…

On the way back from my recent visit to the States, I intentionally stopped in Dordogne to see four of the beaux villages on my list: Beynac-et-Cazenac, Castlenaud-la-Chapelle, Monpazier, and St. Jean-de-Côle.

A Day in Beynac-et-Cazenac and Castlenaud-la-Chapelle

Because they’re so close together, you can visit both of these villages in a day. Admittedly, I lingered over lunch in Beynac so I didn’t see as much as I could have. But then, relaxing to enjoy your surroundings is part of the journey, too.

Beynac-et-Cazenac

If you dream about France, like I do, you’ve seen Beynac-et-Cazenac in your dreams. It’s a fairytale French villages perched above the Dordogne river, complete with narrow cobblestone streets, storybook houses and a stately castle at the top. You would expect Cinderella and her prince to appear at any moment.

Like all Plus Beaux Villages de France, Beynac is tiny. The max population for beaux villages is 2000. In 2015 Beynac had 552 residents.

It takes only a few hours to walk around town and through the castle. If you’re driving you can find parking at several levels on the way up to the castle. It’s a pretty steep climb if you stop at the bottom and you only want to visit the castle.

I strongly advise you plan to spend enough time in Beynac to stroll the streets and enjoy the medieval architecture. There are not many places that are as original and as well maintained.

They say the castle, “Château de Beynac”, is the most authentic example of a feudal fortress in the Pèrigord. Towering above the river and valley, it is a reminder of legendary conquerors like King Richard “the Lionhearted” who walked this very courtyard and within the stone walls.  Likewise, it is a shrine to wars that raged through Dordogne for over nine centuries.

If you visit Beynac on I sunny day like I did, enjoy a lovely meal with a “to die for” view of the river at La Terrasse des Chateaux.

Castlenaud-la-Chapelle

Literally down the road from Beynac-et-Cazenac is the plus beaux village Castlenaud-la-Chapelle. The magnificent castle, Château de Castelnaud, soars above the Céou River valley as if to announce “Look at me!”

Dordogne's Plus Beaux Villages

The proud castle, like its neighbor in Beynac, was the site of numerous wars and confrontations, including the Hundred Years War. It changed occupants between the French and the English seven times. During its history, the castle was burned to the ground, rebuilt, abandoned during the French Revolution, then used as a stone quarry. During WWII the fortress gave shelter to French resistance groups. Between 1974 and 2005 it was restored to its near-original state.

Dordogne's Plus Beaux Villages

Today the castle is one of the most visited spots in Dordogne, especially by families with children. A museum features medieval weapons from all over Europe. In the village perigordine style houses with high-pitched roofs are tightly terraced along narrow streets.

Dordogne's Plus Beaux Villages

When visiting Castlenaud-la-Chapelle there’s a large parking lot at the top. You can walk directly to the castle from there. That view alone will make your day!

Dordogne's Plus Beaux Villages

Stay tuned for photos and an overview of the visit to Monpazier and St. Jean du Côle. To read about the earlier tour of Domme and La Roque-Gageac, click here

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Dordogne's Plus Beaux Villages

 

 

 

travel guide to Dordogne

Travel Guide to Dordogne: Hints, Finds and Faux-Pas

After a week-long visit to Dordogne I’d like to pass on some personal thoughts that could be helpful to you planning a trip. A travel guide to Dordogne, of sorts, that gives some tips on do’s and don’ts we discovered.  

Planning Hints and Faux-Pas

Narrow it down Dordogne is a big place — the third largest department in metropolitan France. If you have only a few days to visit, choose your route with the intention to visit only one, maybe two, places each day. Our first two days we made too many stops, then we slowed down our pace. You don’t want to return from your trip and it’s all a “blur.”

travel guide to Dordogne

Map of Dordogne region

“Home” base – Changing places to stay every night is exhausting for me. Sometimes it’s unavoidable. If possible, find a central location and “camp out” there for two or three nights. Our mistake on this trip was that our home base was in the middle of nowhere. Even finding a place for a meal was a problem. So stay in a village where you can buy a glass of wine, or two, when you arrive back in the evening.

A place to relax – Your “home” base is probably not going to be your “place to relax.” You’ll be busy traveling from there to hither and beyond. Choose to spend a couple of nights where you can “chill”. Make it towards the end of your holiday, perhaps, so you’ll be relaxed when you return home.  Choose something special — a little village by the river, or at a chateau.

travel guide to Dordogne

Chateau Mercues

Travel guide to Dordogne

Bad weather alternatives – As  much as you hate to think about bad weather during your holiday, it happens. We were fortunate to be close to Lascaux, so we spent our one day of rain underground, in a cave. No caves? Shopping and wine tastings are great alternatives, too!

travel guide to Dordogne

Painted caves at Lascaux

Time to dine – One thing you don’t want to miss about the Dordogne is the food. If you wish to enjoy the canard, the fois gras, the cheese, the wine …. remember you’re in France. In some towns and villages, restaurants serve dinner starting a 7:00 pm. During heavy tourist season you may be more fortunate to find businesses that have longer hours, but don’t always count on it. Plan your day accordingly. Stock up on cheese, bread, wine and fruit that you can enjoy in your room — just in case.  Take plenty of water bottles that you can fill whenever you stop.

travel guide to Dordogne

Photo opportunities – As much as I hate to admit it, getting up early in the morning is a good idea if you want great photos from the Dordogne. My friend, Julie, has some fabulous sunrise shots. For example, the best shots of Rocamadore are taken early in the morning, before the sun shines right into your camera lens. Bring several camera batteries, chargers and, if possible, more than one camera. My iPhone, iPad and camera were all put into action at one time or another.

travel guide to Dordogne

This photo of Rocamadore could have been so much better!

Travel guide to Dordogne

Driving hazards

If you plan to drive through the Dordogne — which is fabulous, by the way — be prepared for “interesting” road conditions along the way.

Maps vs. GPS – I love my Garmin GPS. However … there were a few places we wanted to go that Garmin didn’t recognise. That’s because we didn’t program it before we left on the trip. Oh dear. That’s where my map-reading friend, Julie came in. She had every map of this part of France that’s been printed, I believe. If you want to use a GPS, check the route beforehand.

Curvy roads, one-way roads and bridges – If you think you are used to back road driving, Dordogne is a test to your skills. Roads that lead to some of the most charming places are way off the beaten path. In many cases, you’ll think the road you’re on is a path.

Travel guide to Dordogne

Favorite places 

Click on each of the links below to read about my favorite places we visited and view the photos.

Rocamadore

Sarlat

Lascaux

 

Best finds

Albi’s Saint Cecil Cathedral and Toulouse-Latrec Museum

Abbey in Brantome

Saturday market in Sarlat

 

Whatever you do … eat fois gras! 

 

For more on the Dordogne

7 Days in Dordogne: Step-by-Step 

7 Days in Dordogne: Albi to Cahors

7 Days in Dordogne: Cahors to Sarlat

7 Days In Dordogne: Lascaux to Brantôme

7 Days in Dordogne: Rocamadour

7 Days in Dordogne: Market Day in Sarlat

7 Days in Dordogne: Up, Up and Away!

7 Days in Dordogne: The Finale

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7 Days in Dordogne: The Finale

After six days in Dordogne with my Colorado friend, it was time for the grand finale. We threw caution to the wind and took our very first hot air balloon ride over the Loire Valley. Visiting Chenonceau no less.

The tour of the Château at Chenonceau is not exactly what you’d expect from a tour of the Dordogne region of France. It’s in the Loire Valley. We drove a long way to get there, but it was worth it in every way — and from every angle.

Visiting Chenonceau

First, a boat ride on the River Cher.

A summer event that everyone looks forward to attending is Uzès Fete Votive

River boat launch at Chenonceaux

 

Visiting Chenonceau

River view of the Chateau at Chenonceau

 

 

Visiting Chenonceau

 

Visiting Chenonceau

 

Visiting Chenonceau

 

Visiting Chenonceau

 

…and if that wasn’t enough…

Balloon over Château Chenonceau

Visiting Chenonceau

Balloon ride over the Chateau at Chenonceau and the Loire Valley

Visiting Chenonceau

 

Visiting Chenonceau

Visiting Chenonceau

 

Visiting Chenonceau

 

Visiting Chenonceau

 

Visiting Chenonceau

 

Visiting Chenonceau

Balloon over Chateau at Chenonceau and the Loire Valley

 

My first balloon ride!!!

balloon over Château Chenonceau

 

A toast to Julie and to me for a fun and memorable reunion! Here’s to friends! 

May they be with us for a reason, for a season … for a lifetime!

For more about the Dordogne

7 Days in Dordogne: Step-by-Step 

7 Days in Dordogne: Albi to Cahors

7 Days in Dordogne: Cahors to Sarlat

7 Days In Dordogne: Lascaux to Brantôme

7 Days in Dordogne: Rocamadour

7 Days in Dordogne: Market Day in Sarlat

7 Days in Dordogne: Up, Up and Away!

 

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7 Days in Dordogne: Up, Up and Away!

What a day! What a way to end the week traveling and touring in Dordogne. Let’s just say, it ended on a very high note.

My traveling companion and long-lost and found friend from grade school, Julie, and I put some serious miles behind us. We drove over four hours straight from Sarlat to Tours. I’m dropping Julie off at the train station in Tours tomorrow and heading back toward Uzes. Julie’s going on to Paris for a few days before returning to Colorado.

Before we ended our “reunion” tour, we were giving ourselves the last “treat” of our journey. As you may remember, we planned two special treats for the trip. One was an overnight stay and dinner in a chateau.  The last we scheduled for today. We ventured into the Loire Valley to see one of the most magical royal chateaus in France. More than that, we experienced the chateau from every angle possible.

Touring Chenonceau

The Château at Chenonceau 

Known as the “Ladies Château,” Chenonceau was built in the 16th century on the remains of a 14th century castle and mill belonging to the Marquay family. There are writings, however, that mention the castle and mill as early as the 11th century. Still intact from the Marquay era is the chateau’s well and the Marques tower which was restored in the Renaissance style.

The property is in the Loire Valley and has been inhabited throughout history by the mistress of a King, Queens, heiresses and business tycoons. It is currently owned by a member of the Menier family, famous for their chocolates.

I’ll leave the history and stories of the château for a later post. Today will be a photo tour. A most unusual one, too. I was particularly interested in the “crooks and crannies” of the place since everything else is in hundreds of books.

Touring in Dordogne

Château at Chenonceau

Touring in Dordogne

 

Touring in Dordogne

 

Touring in Dordogne

Touring in Dordogne

Touring in Dordogne

Touring in Dordogne

Touring in Dordogne

Touring in Dordogne

Touring in Dordogne

Touring in Dordogne

Touring in Dordogne

Touring in Dordogne

Touring in Dordogne

 

Touring in Dordogne: Chenonceau 


Touring in Dordogne

Touring in Dordogne

Touring in Dordogne

Touring in Dordogne

Touring in Dordogne

Touring in Dordogne

Touring in Dordogne

Touring in Dordogne

Part 2…stay tuned…

For more on the Dordogne

7 Days in Dordogne: Step-by-Step 

7 Days in Dordogne: Albi to Cahors

7 Days in Dordogne: Cahors to Sarlat

7 Days In Dordogne: Lascaux to Brantôme

7 Days in Dordogne: Rocamadour

7 Days in Dordogne: Market Day in Sarlat

7 Days in Dordogne: The Finale

 

 

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7 Days in Dordogne: Market Day in Sarlat

Sarlat. You’re the winner. Of all the places I’ve been on my Dordogne tour these past five days,  I like you the best. 

Ok. I’m a sucker for market days. That’s how I fell in love with –and moved to– Uzes.

Take a look at Sarlat!

Dordogne tour

Market day in Sarlat

Dordogne tour
Dordogne tour

Dordogne tour

 

Dordogne Tour

Maybe what I fell in love with in Sarlat was the cool hand-made bag I bought from this guy…

Dordogne tour

 

Or the foie gras…



Dordogne tour

Dordogne tour

Dordogne tour

 

Or the walnuts (“noix” not “noisette”)



Dordogne tour

Dordogne Tour

Perhaps it was the buildings and the alleyways
Dordogne tour
Dordogne tour
Dordogne tour
Dordogne tour

Dordogne tour

 

…and the amazing church where I could feel the Spirit…

Dordogne tour
Dordogne tour
Dordogne tour
Dordogne tour

Dordogne Tour

I wish you could have been there to taste the galette and the cider.



Dordogne tour

The macaroons…

Dordogne tour

I’m sure you’d feel the same. 

Dordogne tour

It was so much fun we almost ended up with feathers braided in our hair!

Dordogne tour

Tomorrow’s adventure? A surprise!

Stay tuned…

For more about the Dordogne

7 Days in Dordogne: Step-by-Step 

7 Days in Dordogne: Albi to Cahors

7 Days in Dordogne: Cahors to Sarlat

7 Days In Dordogne: Lascaux to Brantôme

7 Days in Dordogne: Rocamadour

Visit Rocamadour

7 Days in Dordogne: Rocamadour

Day five in the seven-day Dordogne marathon trip with my long-time friend, Julie, was one thing we looked forward to the most– Visit Rocamadour.

The village carved into a hill, Rocamadour, takes at least a half-day to explore. It is recommended you arrive early to catch the best view because it is east-facing. Oh well…today we took our time leaving the hotel and probably enjoyed the visit more because we were rested. There are lots of hills and steps to climb.

Visit Rocamadour

Walking tour map of Rocamadour

 

Visit Rocamadour

Walking tour map Rocamadour

Visit Rocamadour

Rocamadour

 

Visit Rocamadour

I’d heard of Rocamadore many times, and seen pictures, I knew little about its history. Did you know the name of the village is really “Roc-Amadore” and it was named for Saint Amadore? Did you know that Saint Amadore was thought by many to be Zacchaeus of the Bible. Did you know a bone of Saint Amadore’s is enshrined at the chapel in Rocamadour?

Visit Rocamadour

Relic Bone of Zacchaeus

 

That’s only the beginning of the tales and legends of the place so many have visited. The eleventh century. Rocamadour is, in fact, a pilgrim’s center.

Visit Rocamadour

 

Aside from being along the trail of Compostella, Rocamadore’s holy relics bring worshippers there to “admire” to “contemplate” and to “pray.”

Visit Rocamadour
Visit Rocamadour

 

Admiring” Rocamodore is easy. 

Visit Rocamadour
Visit Rocamadour
Visit Rocamadour
Visit Rocamadour
Visit Rocamadour
Visit Rocamadour


“Contemplating” wasn’t easy with the crowds of people everywhere, even though vacation season is over. 

 

Visit Rocamadour

Praying” is inevitable when you realize the importance of the shrines throughout the village.

 

Visit Rocamadour

Remains of Saint Amadour inside

Visit Rocamadour
Visit Rocamadour

 

Almost every town you visit in France has a memorial to their war dead. Rocamadore is no exception. Mostly remembered are the veterans of the “Great War” — World War I

Visit Rocamadour

Statue honoring war dead in Rocamadour

Visit Rocamadour
Visit Rocamadour
Visit Rocamadour

 

Of course, a day in France always means great food. That’s a given. And what’s a meal without a pichet of rose? 

Visit Rocamadour

Beautiful lamp chops!

Truly, I adore Roc-AMADORE.

Visit Rocamadour
Tomorrow.. Market day in Sarlat.

Stay tuned…

For more on the Dordogne

7 Days in Dordogne: Step-by-Step 

7 Days in Dordogne: Albi to Cahors

7 Days in Dordogne: Cahors to Sarlat

7 Days In Dordogne: Lascaux to Brantôme

7 Days in Dordogne: Market Day in Sarlat

7 Days in Dordogne: Up, Up and Away!

7 Days in Dordogne: The Finale

 

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Wish for France

7 Days In Dordogne: Lascaux to Brantôme

Caves, canals and missteps describe day four of the Dordogne seven day adventure. 

Overcast and rainy weather changed our planned route for day four of our Dordogne seven day adventure Good thing we are driving. Instead of Rocamadour we headed for the painted cave at Lascaux.

The route to Lascaux from our hotel wasn’t very long so we gave ourselves a little time before setting out. Interestingly, the curvy roads and scenery along part of the way reminded us North Carolina girls of our own Blue Ridge Mountains. Same trees, same rocks and hills. Or so it seemed.

Before reaching Lascaux, we read we were to buy tickets at the tourist office in the nearby town of Montignac. Not so. After stopping there…and a brief visit to an art exhibit in the local church where I came close to buying these handmade items…

Dordogne seven day adventure

Art and craft exhibit in Montignac

Dordogne seven day adventure

Dordogne seven day adventure

 

…we went to the Lascaux park site for tickets. Or let’s say, we set off to find our way there.

Hint: If you are navigating with a Garmin or other device, shut it off here. Follow the printed road signs to Lascaux. If not, you’ll spend your precious time going in circles.

Dordogne Seven Day Adventure: Lascaux II

Lascaux I is the original, authentic, painted cave found by four boys and their dog in 1940. The cave was closed in 1963 to prevent the drawings being destroyed by human contact — mostly CO2. Lascaux II was opened to the public in 1983 as an exact replica of the original. Lascaux IV, a new, modern park and more exhibits, is under construction. It is supposed to open this year. Hmmm…

Photos were not allowed within the cave, but these photos may give you an idea of the park area and surroundings.

Dordogne seven day adventure

Lascaux

Dordogne seven day adventure
After lunch at a brasserie in Montignac, we dead-headed for Brantôme, mostly driving on a super-highway.

Yes, foie gras again. A Dordogne hamburger, that is, with thin slices of duck breast, too.

 

Dordogne seven day adventure
Dordogne Seven Day Adventure: Brantome

Oh la la! Step aside, Sarlat, I may like Brantôme best yet! What a beautiful town!

 

Dordogne seven day adventure

Brantôme

By the time we’d left Montignac, the sun was shining. The perfect setting for Brantôme. The town is straight out of a fairytale, complete with knights in shiny armour.

 

Dordogne seven day adventure

 

Brantôme is on an island surrounded by the River Dronne. The centerpiece of the town is the abbey, founded by cave-dwelling monks in the eight century.

 

Dordogne seven day adventure
The abbey, the caves and the bell-tower, said to be the oldest is France, are must-sees. The carvings in the cave and the tale of the Abbey though the centuries is remarkable. It’s one of my favorite sites along this journey.

 

Dordogne seven day adventure
Dordogne seven day adventure

Dordogne seven day adventure

Dordogne seven day adventure

Dordogne seven day adventure

Hint: If you plan to have dinner in Brantôme you’ll have to wait until 7 pm. 

Back to Sarlat

When we discovered we wouldn’t find a place to eat dinner in Brantôme, and it was after 6pm and a two hour drive back to our hotel, we decided to go straight to the neighborhood restaurant near our hotel.

Arriving back in Marquay, the hotel manager, Joel, gave directions to the cafe …only a few steps away in the village.nAlas, when we arrived, the restaurant was closed. We dragged our hungry selves back to the hotel where Joel had another suggestion.

“Just five minutes down the road,” he  said, drawing a map with curved lines and “x’s.”

 

Back in the car we went …in the dark. By the time we had traveled for ten minutes or so, we knew we had missed the turn to the restaurant. Oh well, Sarlat was five minutes away.

 “Stop at the first place that’s open,” we said, almost simultaneously.

The first place was a bar that served pizzas. It appeared to be men-only.

“Never mind” the waiter was gorgeous.

Dordogne seven day adventure

When I told him he looked like a movie star, but I couldn’t remember his name, the handsome man looked puzzled. When I told him the star was married to Penelope Cruz,  he said: “Javier Bardem.”

We all burst into laughter.

Dordogne seven day adventure
The black cloud that had gathered over our evening was lifted.  And the pizza was delicious.

Tomorrow, Rocamodore.

Stay tuned…

For more on the Dordogne

7 Days in Dordogne: Step-by-Step 

7 Days in Dordogne: Albi to Cahors

7 Days In Dordogne: Lascaux to Brantôme

7 Days in Dordogne: Rocamadour

7 Days in Dordogne: Market Day in Sarlat

7 Days in Dordogne: Up, Up and Away!

7 Days in Dordogne: The Finale

 


 

Seven Day Dordogne Tour

7 Days in Dordogne: Cahors to Sarlat

On the third day of the seven day Dordogne tour with my friend since kindergarten, we finally got it right.  

We narrowed down the “to do” list for our seven day Dordogne tour to a manageable number of places to see in one day. We came up with the concepts of “walkabouts” and “drive by photo shootings.” In other words, there are places where we want to park the car and walk around, and there are others we just want to drive through and take pictures on the run.

We’ve gotten quite good at spotting a perfect photo opportunity, slowing the car down to a near-stop, then Julie taking a picture out the window.

Today’s adventure started after we took more photos and checked out of our “dream” Chateau Mercués outside Cahors.

Seven Day Dordogne Tour

Chateau Mercués

 

Seven Day Dordogne Tour: Home of Josephine Baker

First stop: Les Milandes, Chateau built by Caumont family in the 1400’s and former home of Josephine Baker. 

Seven Day Dordogne Tour

Chateau Les Milandes

The self-guided tour through the chateau and the immaculate grounds was well worth the time and 3.5 euros fee. Costumes and possessions of the American songstress and philanthropist, who dazzled Paris during the 30’s at the Follies Bergere were displayed throughout the chateau. Most rooms had the furnishings and decorations that were owned and used by Baker and her large family, the “Rainbow Tribe,” while living there. (No inside photos allowed.)

 

Seven Day Dordogne Tour

Seven Day Dordogne Tour:  Roque Gageac

As if carved into the side of cliffs, Le Rogue Gageac is a small and friendly tourist town alongside the Dordogne. There were lots of tourists, but not so many as we imagined had filled the town a few weeks earlier.

Seven Day Dordogne Tour

Le Rogue Gageac

Seven Day Dordogne Tour

Le Rogue Gageac

Seven Day Dordogne Tour

Le Rogue Gageac

It was here we began to see our first signs of foie gras– the duck delicacy found famously in this part of the world.

Seven Day Dordogne Tour

Seven Day Dordogne Tour
Could there be anything better than a salad with duck gizzards, slices of smoked duck and foi gras, and a cold glass of beer on a day with temperatures in the high 90’s? (35 degrees Celsius)

Seven Day Dordogne Tour: Domme

The picturesque town above the Dordogne valley was a bit of a surprise to me. I thought it was going to be much larger than it is. While quite a nice place with cute shops and cafes, Domme was a quick stop for us. Parking the car for an hour and walking around taking photos was quite enough for us to say we’d “done” Domme

Seven Day Dordogne Tour

Domme

Seven Day Dordogne Tour

Domme

 

Seven Day Dordogne Tour

Domme

 

I will say,  if we had not already stopped for lunch, this spot that looks over the valley would have given us a great view.

Seven Day Dordogne Tour

Domme

 

Seven Day Dordogne Tour

Domme

 

Seven Day Dordogne Tour: Sarlat

If I didn’t love Uzes so much, Sarlat could possibly be my next home. Oh my! To die for! 

 

Seven Day Dordogne Tour

Sarlat

After a “drive by photo shooting” in Beynac-et-Cazenet where the pictures of the town and chateau are still in Julie’s camera, we landed in Sarlat.

Today’s visit to Sarlat was short — mostly to find where to park and where to go on Saturday for market day. I can tell I want to spend more time exploring the place, its shops, cafes and intriguing back street.

 

Seven Day Dordogne Tour

Sarlat

Seven Day Dordogne Tour

Sarlat

Seven Day Dordogne Tour

Sarlat

 

Seven Day Dordogne Tour

Sarlat

 

Seven Day Dordogne Tour: Marquay

I’m not certain how we decided on this spot to stay for the next three nights, but the tiny village of Marquay is giving us a welcomed respite from our hurried pace.

 

Seven Day Dordogne Tour

Marquay

Actually, the small, family-owned hotel outside Sarlat is a good jumping off place for each of the next days on our trip. A “home base,” so to speak. It’s a far cry from the luxurious chateau last night, but it’s cozy and friendly, and everything we need to recharge and move on.

 

 

Next stop: Lascaux 

 

Stay tuned…

 

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