Category: San Quentin la Poterie

Pottery at San Quentin La Poterie France

Oh La La! San Quentin la Poterie, France

Imagine a little village in the south of France where the main industries are farming and pottery. Can you think of a place that is more “down to earth?” (Pun intended!)

Friday is market day in San Quentin la Poterie. It’s only a few miles down the road from Uzes and it’s getting to be one of my favorite places to shop. There’s the farmers’ market with all the local foods and vendors …

… but even better than the farmers’ market, through the winding village streets, there are dozens of pottery shops. Many stores have the artist’s workshop attached. Most if the artists are there, busy at work on their new creations.

When they say San Quentin is world famous for pottery, they mean pottery of the finest kind. Not to discount our fabulous potters from western North Carolina, but I have never seen so much magnificent pottery. Each shop I visited was better than the last.

View a San Quentin la Poterie artist at work.

It’s Time for “La Tournée du Père Noël” in San Quentin la Poterie

A bonus to living in Uzes is Christmas in San Quentin la Poterie just down the road. The small town is filled with dozens of pottery shops and other sorts of magical places.   On this day it was La Tournée du Père Noël, the annual holiday market.

Follow me along as I wander through the streets and into the shops ….

 

 

Christmas in San Quentin la Poterie

 

 

 

The whole town of San Quentin la Poterie seemed to be out this day. If they weren’t joining shoppers, they were doing their favorite things — bingo 

… and Pétanque

Christmas in San Quentin la Poterie

Playing Pétanque in San Quentin la Poterie

 

 

Christmas in San Quentin la Poterie

 

What a glorious way to start the holiday!

Christmas in San Quentin la Poterie

 

 

The Best Ever Le Chocolat Chaud

Lucky us! Recipes for a French favorite, Le Chocolat Chaud are below!

I loved writing this post for my friends at Cook’n With Class Uzes. It brought back all types of memories. Please comment and share your all-time best chocolate experience.

So much time, so many places, so much chocolate

February is one of my favorite months. Perhaps that’s because it’s the month of my birthday and Valentine’s Day. Just a week apart, in fact. I love February because it’s when I give myself permission to splurge on chocolate. Starting with a box of chocolates on Valentine’s Day and finishing with the last morsel of chocolate fudge cake on my birthday, I cram as much of my favorite sweet into a month as possible.

When I started writing this post about chocolate, I thought it might be interesting to bring back memories of my very favorite chocolate experiences. There have been so many to sort through, but here’s a go at it.

Visions from years ago take me back to the 5&10 Cent stores my father owned in North Carolina. When I was barely old enough to reach the cash register, I could easily scoop out candies for customers from behind the glass case in the front of the store. Those days the “good” chocolates were sold in assortments in shiny boxes stacked on shelves. Candy counter chocolates I remember were wafer-thin and coated with multi-colored sprinkles, or they came as chocolate-covered raisins and nuts.

Later in my chocolate years, I discovered the most heavenly fudge in Cape May, New Jersey, made daily with fresh dairy cream. In Minnesota General Mills was testing Pillsbury Pie Shops in a few shopping centers. Customers, including me, lined up to buy their velvety French Silk Pies. Ricotta-cream-chocolate chip cannolis with dark chocolate-dipped shells in New York’s Little Italy were totally irresistible, as I recall. Then there was that “pain au chocolat” at Le Grenier à Pain in Paris.

“So much time, so many places, so much chocolate.”

Now that I live in France, it’s not surprising that I would have my most exhilarating chocolate experience right here.

Just a few months ago I was entertaining new expat friends who were overnight guests at my home in Uzes. We drove to one of my favorite places to take people on a tour of the area — San Quentin la Poterie. The small town is famous for its potteries where you will often find craftsmen at work in their shops.

On this particular day it was quite blustery — as those who know “Le Mistral” can understand — so we bundled up with hats and scarves before we left Uzes. Walking along the narrow, winding streets of San Quentin, I knew the sharp wind would surely turn too cold for comfort if we weren’t prepared.

Arriving in San Quentin la Poterie and after looking through several shops, my friends and I ran across L’Effet Reve , a tiny store where I had bought a few items for my apartment. I reminded them about the little daybed they’d admired at my place and I urged them to see the shop where I’d found it.

San Quentin la Poterie shop

San Quentin la Poterie shop

The sound of tingling bells announced our arrival when we opened the door to enter. Almost immediately, the shopkeeper appeared. As delightful as ever, she invited us in and asked if we would like a beverage? “Tea? Cafe? Chocolat Chaud?”

“Chocolat chaud?” we answered almost in unison.

“Oui” she said .. followed by something else in French.

(Let me stop here for a moment to remind you, I don’t speak French, even after two years living in France. That’s another story.)

While I was trying to disquise the fact that i understood only one tenth of what the shop keeper was saying, my friends told me later she makes the chocolat chaud from scratch. With melted chocolate.

After taking our order, the shop keeper set off for the kitchen and we busied ourselves rambling through the store. As always it was filled with pretty little antique items and nostalgic home decorations; delicate lace items to wear; and an array of tableware, arranged tastefully with new and vintage linens. It was like visiting inside a life-size doll house.

L'Effet Reve in San Quentin la Poterie

San Quentin la Poterie

 

Just as I was lifting a wine goblet out of its place to examine it, our hostess approached and lead us to a small alcove in the store. The cozy space was decorated like a parlor or Victorian sitting room. She sat us at a petite wrought iron table in the center of the room. When we removed our coats and were obviously comfortable, she brought from the kitchen the first of three giant cups of “chocolat chaud.” She placed it in front of me. Then she served another, then the last . Each of the fine bone china cups was the size of a soup bowl. Each was filled to the brim with piping hot chocolate. Saucers beneath the cups held two dainty shortbread cookies each.

 

Chocolat Chaud in San Quentin la Poterie

Chocolat Chaud in San Quentin la Poterie

 

Holding my cup by the handle on the side, supported by my hand on the bottom, I took a sip of the heavenly brew. “Oh my!” I exclaimed. “Surely these cups with beautifully hand-painted, gold-leaf laurels have never held such a delicacy,” I said to myself.

With the first sip of the drink my tastebuds burst wide open from the subtle sweetness; then the flavor of chocolate — deep, rich, cocoa. With a second, bigger sip the velvety liquid filled my mouth. I was delirious. How could anything taste this good? I glanced at my friends to see their reaction.

“This is the best ‘chocolat chaud’ I’ve ever tasted,” we all chanted.

When I turned back to closely examine what I had put into my mouth, I noticed how the thick, smooth mixture clung impishly to the sides of the vessel. Minuscule specs of chocolate floated on top and down into the center of the devilish concoction as I stirred the drink with a spoon. The consistency was like creamed soup, which caused me to take a few spoonfuls instead of sips. The taste reminded me of every piece of fabulous chocolate I had ever eaten. Memories were swirling in my head as I gazed into the masterpiece before me.

“Can I stay here forever?” I pleaded with the shopkeeper.

Switching between drinking and spooning the heavenly delight.. and ignoring my friends and all around me … too soon I saw the bottom of the cup. It was over. That was it.

“It may be a long time before I taste chocolate this good again,” I said to myself, sadly.

“Lucky you,” joked one friend. “You can come back here anytime,” she said in a jealous tone.

“Exactement!” I exclaimed in my poor French. “San Quentin la Poterie is almost next door!”
Note: The Chocolat Chaud recipe at L’Effet Reve is top secret. However, here’s a version of the rich dessert drink for you from Cook’n With Class Uzes’ Chef Eric. Also! another recipe from one of Barefoot Blogger’s followers who declares “it’s absolutely the best, and easiest, hot choc. ever!” 

Chef Eric’s Le Chocolat Chaud

Serves 4
Ingredients

2 ½ cups whole milk
1 ½ cups whipped cream {35 %}
¼ cup granulated sugar
¼ cup Cocoa powder, unsweetened
1 Pinch of salt
1 Teaspoon Vanilla extract

In a saucepan, warm 2 cups of milk with 1 cup of cream. In the mean time mix sugar, cocoa, salt, the vanilla extract and the rest of the milk (1/2 cup), mix well until you obtain a paste with no lumps. Turn the stove on low, then add the paste slowly to the warm milk; whisk well to get a foamy creamy chocolate. Reheat until it is hot but don’t let the liquid boil! Whip the left over cream (1/2 cup) until you have a smooth whipped cream. Pour the hot chocolate into the serving cups, pour the cream on top….

Serve immediately.

Paula’s “Parisian Hot Chocolate Recipe: Le Chocolat Chaud”

(Courtesy of David Leibowitz)

Four ‘Parisian-sized’ Servings

Ingredients

2 cups (.5l) whole milk
5 ounces (130 g) bittersweet chocolate, (best-quality), finely chopped
optional: 2 tablespoons light brown sugar

1. Heat the milk in a medium-sized saucepan.

2. Once the milk is warm, whisk in the chocolate, stirring until melted and steaming hot. For a thick hot chocolate, cook at a very low boil for about 3 minutes, whisking constantly. Be careful and keep an eye on the mixture, as it may boil up a bit during the first moments.

3. Taste, and add brown sugar if desired.

Serve warm in small demitasse or coffee cups.

Note: This hot chocolate improves if made ahead and allowed to sit for a few hours. Rewarm before serving. I also like to add a few flecks of fleur de sel, the very good sea salt from Brittany.

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Shopping Finds in San Quentin la Poterie

Shopping Finds in San Quentin la Poterie

No matter how many times I visit the villages near Uzes, I find something new and irresistible.

My destination was San Quentin la Poterie — the home of some of the most amazing potters in all of France.

This time, I did find a pottery shop I’ve never seen before …

….but it was a little out-of-the-way gift shop that was a real gem.

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L’Effet Reve in San Quentin de la Poterie

From the outside, the shop was quite unassuming. In fact, I almost passed it by. The promise of tea and pastries advertised in the window, however, drew me in.

At first glance, the store looked like so many you see in the States, filled with little nick nacks and kitchenware. It was not until I wandered into the rooms hidden in the back that I discovered the true treasures.

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Inside L’Effet Reve in San Quentin la Poterie

san quentin la poterie

Yes, this petite iron sofa would be perfect in my apartment! Oh drool!

san quentin la poterie

Too bad I was penny-pinching that day, or I would have fit it in the back trunk of my car, “Lucy.”

Beyond the little rooms and cubby holes in L’Effet Reve, was the pièce de résistance — a charming outdoor tea room…

san quentin la poterie

Outdoor tea room

… decorated to delightful perfection.

san quentin la poterie

Shopping Finds in San Quentin la Poterie

Little villages near Uzes

Sometimes the little places close to Uzes never make it to the tourist lists. Yet they can be the most charming places of all.

Here are more sights and scenes that make San Quentin la Poterie so much fun to visit.

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Little rooms that stretch over arched walkways

 

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Mosaics along the street in San Quentin de la Poterie

 

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Narrow, colorful walkways in San Quentin la Poterie

 

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Little ladies shelling and selling almonds along the street

 

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Art and artists everywhere

 

And pottery !!!

Hopefully you enjoyed this pictorial visit to San Quentin la Poterie. Be certain to put this little village on your “must see” when you visit the south of France.

Other views of the town are in several earlier posts. Just search “San Quentin la Poterie” on the “My Travels” page.

Oh… by the way… don’t try to beat me to it.  I’m calling tomorrow to see if the little sofa is still waiting for me!

san quentin la poterie

Travel Diary for Foodies

Travel Diary for Foodies
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There’s no better way for a “foodie” to recap a year’s travel than to revisit meals and favorite foods devoured along the way.

Enjoy the journey!

Macaroons from Christmas Market, Uzes

Macaroons from Christmas Market, Uzes

Christmas Market, Uzes

Chicken Stewing at Christmas Market, Uzes

Appetizers in Turkey: Calamari and Mixed Seafoods

Appetizers in Turkey: Calamari and Mixed Seafoods

Salmon Salad, San Quentin La Poterie, France

Salmon Salad, San Quentin La Poterie, France

Meat Pies, London, England

Meat Pies, London, England

Fruit Tray for "Southern" Baby Shower, Douglasville, Georgia, USA

Fruit Tray for “Southern” Baby Shower, Douglasville, Georgia, USA

Fresh Greens and Homegrown Tomatoes, Vers-Pont-du-Gard, France

Fresh Greens and Homegrown Tomatoes, Vers-Pont-du-Gard, France

Cappuchino, Port Vendres, France

Cappuchino, Port Vendres, France

Wine! France!

Wine! France!

Garlic! L'Isle sur la Sorgue, France

Garlic! L’Isle sur la Sorgue, France

Ham Biscuits for "Southern" Baby Shower, Douglasville, Georgia, USA

Ham Biscuits for “Southern” Baby Shower, Douglasville, Georgia, USA

Coffee at the Orangery, Kensington Palace, London, UK

Coffee at the Orangery, Kensington Palace, London, UK

Lobster with Penne Pasta in Nice, France

Lobster with Penne Pasta in Nice, France

Shrimp, Oysters and Mussels in Sete, France

Shrimp, Oysters and Mussels in Sete, France

Fresh Greens with Lardon and Goat Cheese in Uzes, France

Fresh Greens with Lardon and Goat Cheese in Uzes, France

Bruschetta in Florence, Italy

Bruschetta in Florence, Italy

Street Vendor Paella in Arles, France

Street Vendor Paella in Arles, France

Seafood Starter in Lacoste, France

Seafood Starter in Lacoste, France

Greens and Chicken Salad, Roussillon, France

Greens and Chicken Salad, Roussillon, France

Punch with Fruit Ring, "Southern" Baby Shower, Douglasville, Georgia, USA

Punch with Fruit Ring, “Southern” Baby Shower, Douglasville, Georgia, USA

Fish and Chips, London, UK

Fish and Chips, London, UK

Gnocchis au Chèvre et Aubergine in Nice, France

Gnocchis au Chèvre et Aubergine in Nice, France

"Four Seasons" Pizza in Uzes, France

“Four Seasons” Pizza in Uzes, France

"Bouchon de Lyonaisse" Salad in Lyon, France

“Bouchon de Lyonaisse” Salad in Lyon, France

Everest Beer, Kathmandu, Nepal

Everest Beer, Kathmandu, Nepal

Oysters, Shrimp, Tapenades at Artists' Fete in Uzes, France

Oysters, Shrimp, Tapenades at Artists’ Fete in Uzes, France

Entrecote and Frites in Avignon, France

Entrecote and Frites in Avignon, France

Sherpa Biscuits in Pokara, Nepal

Sherpa Biscuits in Pokara, Nepal

Saucisson in Uzes, France

Saucisson in Uzes, France

Brioche with Caramel Glace

Brioche with Caramel Glace in Lyon, France

Tuna Steak in Collioure, France

Tuna Steak in Collioure, France

Grilled Octopus, Nova Siri, Italy

Grilled Octopus, Nova Siri, Italy

Pork Medallion, Uzes, France

Pork Medallion, Uzes, France

Fresh Fruit, Brie and Lavender Honey on Crusty French Bread for Lunch!

Fresh Fruit, Brie and Lavender Honey on Crusty French Bread for Lunch!

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Uzes at Christmas: Revisited

Uzes at Christmas: Revisited
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As much as I like to travel to new places and visit again with family I love, I miss my new home in France over the holidays.

Revisit these memorable moments with me from Christmas in the beautiful village of Uzes, France.

 

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Just one of the narrow streets filled with shops and cafes that are decorated to celebrate Christmas in the beautiful village of Uzes, France.

 

Bobo French fashions at Atelier des Ours are extra-special at Christmas

Bobo French fashions at Atelier des Ours are extra-special at Christmas

 

Love the gifts of Provence from this local shop

Love the gifts of Provence from this local shop

 

Macaroons at Christmas Market Uzes. Need I say more?!

Macaroons at Christmas Market Uzes. Need I say more?!

 

Musicians caroling on the sidewalks help create a oldtime holiday mood

Musicians caroling on the sidewalks help create a old time holiday mood

 

The neighborhood wine store and flower shop is decked for all holiday occasions

The neighborhood wine store and flower shop is decked for all holiday occasions

 

Table toppers and other festive decorations fill store windows at Atzana

Table toppers and other festive decorations fill store windows at Atzana

 

Gifts for the season -- galore!

Gifts for the season — galore!

 

Potter at San Quentin La Poterie during Holiday Exhibit

Potter at San Quentin La Poterie during Holiday Exhibit

 

Favorite dress shops are decked with their finest

Favorite dress shops are decked with their finest

 

At wine tastings there's a party going on!

At wine tastings there’s a party going on!

 

Chestnuts roasting at holiday markets

Chestnuts roasting at holiday markets

 

All wait for the Holiday Parade

All wait for the Holiday Parade

 

Saint Nicolas makes his appearance wishing all a 'Joyeux Noël'

Saint Nicolas makes his appearance wishing all a ‘Joyeux Noël’

 

‘Joyeux Noël’ to my friends in France!

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San Quentin la Poterie for Art and Lawrence Durrell

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There must be something in the air in the little village of San Quentin la Poterie that stokes a fire in the creative minds of artists. They are everywhere.

Known especially for fine works of pottery, the town has more than its fair share of painters and sculptors. That’s why a visit to San Quentin la Poterie, which is only down the road from Uzes, is one of my favorite pastimes.

Last week, for instance. Geoffrey called to invite me to tag along with him and Annabelle to an art exhibit in San Quentin. He knew I’d be more than ready to go to the opening event hosted by one of his longtime friends — Antony Daniells.

The venue was a scene straight out of a Romance novel.

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The exhibition was not in a “proper” art gallery but on the grounds of a private home, or maison de ville.  In fact, the art work was displayed on the walls of the ancient stables. 

 

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Entering from the street, through the open wooden gate, there was a courtyard and a garden layered with lush vines, trees and seasonal plantings.

 

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Le chat found the best view for the event

 

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Inside the “stable” the paintings reminded me of the work of the Great Impressionists. (Photos are a poor reflection of the art itself. Hopefully you get the idea.) 

 

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The artist – Antony Daniells

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Anthony Daniells is an American who lived in France, now in Spain. This night he was quite busy entertaining guests for the show. I had not pre-arranged a meeting with him so the blog post was to be short and sweet — just showing the gallery and the art. Later I found out more about the artist. He and Geoffrey have known each other since “before the beginning of time,” Geoffrey says.

Like other things the Barefoot Blogger runs into living in France, there’s a story behind everything. Anthony and Geoffrey’s friendship also involves famous British novelist and poet, Lawrence Durrell.

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You see, Geoffrey and Lawrence Darrell were patrons of the same book store in London — Bernard Stone’s Turret Bookshop.

“Bernie Stone published some of Durrell’s early works,” stated Geoffrey who lived in London at the time of Stone’s bookstore. “When Durrell would come to town, he’d stop in at the bookstore,” he added. “That’s where we met.”

Lawrence Durrell was born to Irish and English parents living in India. After years in India, then Corfu as an adult, Lawrence lived in the village of Sommières, near Uzes, in France until his death in 1990. His younger brother, Gerald, was a renowned naturalist and author of “”My Family and Other Animals.”

“Lawrence had the most beautiful voice,” reminisced Geoffrey about his time with Durrell. “He would read his poetry when I’d see him in the bookstore, ” he said; “.. and later when I lived with him,” he added nonchalantly.

“You lived with Lawrence Durrell?” I exclaimed, almost shouting.

“Why yes,” claimed Geoffrey in his most calm voice. “Well, I didn’t exactly live with him, ” he confessed. “I stayed a few weeks at his home in Sommières before I moved to Uzes,” he explained.

“That’s how I met Tony Daniells,” he continued. “He was a friend of Durrell’s.

“Ah-ha,” said I. “Now I get the connection.”

“I lived in Lawrence’s large chateau in Sommières,” said Geoffrey, “along with he and his exquisitely beautiful wife,” he added. “That’s when I decided to move my family to France,” he remembered; “then I went back to England.”

When Geoffrey returned to France to live, he rented the home of Antony Daniells in Flaux, another small village near Uzes.

“Antony was spending most of his time at his house in Spain so the home in Flaux was empty,” Geoffrey stated. “It was a perfect arrangement,” he added.

The beginning of a long friendship, I discovered.

Although Geoffrey and Antony had not seen each other for years, they were obviously happy to meet again. Daniells now stays in Spain and returns to the Uzes area for his annual art show.

 

On another note, just to peak your interest and curiosity, I met a most delightful woman at the exhibition — Panna Grady — the southern heiress of the 60’s who ran with the likes of Andy Warhol and the “Godfather of Punk”, William Burroughs. These days she is frail and mostly known as a recluse. On the way home from meeting her, I couldn’t help but imagine the stories she has to tell about her life in New York City, living at The Dakota along with John Lennon and Yoko. Perhaps we will meet again.

For more about Lawrence Durrell click here 

 

While thinking about San Quentin la Poterie here are more posts for you to explore:

Off the beaten path: Part 2

Oh la la, La Poterie!

Uzes in November: A Two-Day Tour

Sunday Fetes in France: Wine Tasting and Pottery

 

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Sunday Fetes in France: Wine Tasting and Pottery

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Living in France for a little over three months, I’m beginning to get into the rhythm of the weekly calendar.

Wednesdays and Saturdays are market days; Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays are work days with all the stores and businesses open; on Sundays and Mondays the place shuts down. Streets are quiet and mostly empty. If you want a liter of milk, a loaf of bread, or a bottle of aspirin, you have to drive out of town to buy it.

Sundays during Christmastime are different. There are holiday events at churches, tastings at wine domains and in villages like San Quentin la Poterie.

Here are some highlights from a wine tasting at Domaine du Grand Chemin, a wine domaine near Arles, less than an hour’s drive from Uzes.

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Open house in San Quentin la Poterie; heaven-on-earth for pottery lovers like me.

So many choices. So many amazing artisans. Visiting one shop after another in this small village that’s dedicated to ceramic arts, it’s difficult to realize there is so much talent and variety in one place. This is a “must-see” for visitors to Uzes. This weekend all the shops were open with the artist present. There were many I had never been in before. As hard as it was for me, I walked away with only one small pot and six small coffee cups (tasse).

san Quentin la Poterie

Here’s a slide show for a better view some of my favorite ceramics and artists.

Expat Moving Tips for France

Uzes France: Off the Beaten Track, Part Two

Traveling abroad solo means you can stop whenever, wherever you like. Sightseeing while riding on a bicycle makes it even easier.

It’s a wonder I made any progress on the backroads journey to San Quentin la Poterie and back to Uzes. The scenery is amazing. Everything around is a subject for a picture. When I’d stop my bike to take a photo, I’d have to remind myself to turn around and look back, too.

Like life, some things appear to be better when we look “back” than “through”.

Before starting out on my day’s bike riding adventure, I stopped by the Wednesday Market in the main square, Place aux Herbes. I picked up vegetables and other items to prepare meals for myself the rest of the week. Saturday I’ll shop “fresh” again. More strawberries, cherries, cheeses, and vegetables, plus locally made mustard, beer and Madeline cookies were my stash for the day.

Off to San Quentin la Poterie
It was not difficult to get started on the bike trail to “la Poterie”. I had ridden past the entrance on my way back from the bike rental shop on Tuesday. However, “started” is the operative word above. The path that seemed so clear at the “start” soon dumped me onto a four-way intersection. None of the intersecting roads looked like a bike path. Fortunately there were two men standing in a driveway who could possibly give me directions. Of course neither of them could speak a word of English. Nevertheless, using my map and the universal language –hand waving– they gave me enough information to go on my way.

And oh! What a view!

Another advantage of traveling by bike is that you can take off onto side roads you would miss by car. Who could resist checking out this road with no gates, no signs? Not me. Just look what awaited me!

A hidden path… And just a few feet farther…

Then.. braving it down a well-maintained, tree-lined road, I rode slowing, hoping no one would come after me with dogs or a gun — or both. Soon, in the distance, I could hear chattering voices. Instead of turning around and hightailing it back to the main road, I headed closer to the voices. I would excuse my invasion by saying, “I’m lost.”

By this time I was off the bike and I was pushing it beside me. Taking a few steps ahead, I saw a small stone house to the right of the roadway. The chattering was coming from three or four people sitting around a table on the patio. I could also see a second stone building and the entrance to a large, stately mansion that was surrounded by a stone wall.

Apparently the people sitting around the table enjoying their lunch were house and grounds keepers for the estate. They certainly weren’t guards. They were so heavily engaged in conversation that no one noticed me.

Traveling abroad solo Announcing myself by shouting “bonjour” in my best French, I saw the older woman in the group look my way. She then walked to the road to greet me. As she approached, I held up my iPhone and motioned with my hands that I’d like to take a picture. Seeing that I was neither a threat, nor a professional photographer (a photo journalist with an iPhone?), she said “Ok” in English.

I asked then if I could take pictures of the big house from inside the courtyard. Replying In broken English, she said “someone lives there.”

In other words, “no.”

Not to be dismissed so easily, yet trying to be as polite as possible, I asked if I could take her picture and photograph other sights around the estate. She said “oui”. Viola! My persistence paid off!

Pays de la ceramics
Practically “around the bend” from my off-road venture to the French chateau was the famed village of art pottery: San Quentin la Poterie.

San Quentin la Poterie
With a tradition in pottery since the fourteenth century, the village has maintained it’s reputation for world-class ceramics.

The purpose of my trip here today was to take in the scenery.

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And of course, the food. Salad Nicoise.

Traveling abroad solo

 

Traveling abroad solo

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