Category: Orange

visit Orange, France

Three Very Good Reasons to Visit Orange, France

Not everyone who goes to Provence makes a stop in Orange, France. I’m not sure why because it’s not that far from popular places like Avignon and Châteauneuf-du-Pape. Plus, it’s an extraordinary place to visit. 

I’ve been to visit Orange, France three times now. For three different reasons. The first visit was with my son when he came to Uzés to see me for the first time. It was literally a “drive by” to take photos of the Triumphal Arch and the Roman Theatre (Théâtre Antique) and to stop at Vaison-la-Romaine. Mon fils loves to go to as many UNESCO World Heritage Sites as possible. He’s also a wonderful photographer, so most of the photos I’m sharing with you are his. The second visit to Orange was to attend the opera, Madame Butterfly, at the Théâtre Antique d’Orange. The third trip was for a meeting of Network Provence (women’s business group) that gave me another chance to explore the theatre and town.

Orange is a town of just over 30,000 only 20 kms (12.7 miles) away from Avignon. It was founded as a Roman city in 35 BC. Like Nimes, Orange was established by Roman soldiers who were awarded with land for their service. Also like Nimes, the town was a cultural center with impressive structures like the Roman theatre, built before 25 BC.

1) The Roman Theatre (Théâtre Antique d’Orange) is the first good reason to visit Orange, France

One of the best preserved theatres from Roman times, the Théâtre Antique was classified as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1981. It still has its original stage wall which serves as the external wall. Once covered by an awning, the stage is now covered with glass. The theatre is has three tiers which can seat up to 9.000 spectators. The best seats are up front although none are what you would call comfortable. Hard as a rock, matter of fact.

visit Orange, France

 

visit Orange, France

2) The Opera is the second good reason to visit Orange, France

In 1869 the Théâtre Antique’s three tiers were restored so that the venue could rediscover its past,  hosting performances of the great Greco-Roman tragedies, as well as promoting French authors. Since 1971 the theatre has been home to one of France’s leading summer opera festivals, the “New Chorégies.

Last year I splurged to buy a ticket for “Madame Butterfly.” Seeing it in the magnificent amphitheatre was one of my most treasured memories of France. It’s well worth the cost to just be there.

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 3) The third very good reason to visit Orange, France is to see and experience the country’s biggest and most important sites of Gallo-Roman artifacts

Even if you’re not into history, you can’t help but be amazed by the ancient structures, including whole cities of Roman ruins that remain in and around Orange. In addition to the Théâtre Antique, a Roman Temple was discovered during the excavation of the amphitheatre. A Roman arch is a famous landmark in Orange and not far away are two Roman neighborhoods in Vaison-la-Romaine –Puymin and La Villasse.  Once part of the Roman city of Vasio, the neighborhoods span over two eight-hectare sites. While there can stroll along the paved streets where the Romans lived, worked and shopped. You can walk through the homes of the town’s wealthiest families. You can see what remains of the fountains and pools, the kitchen, the living areas and garden. You can witness the grand design of “Maison à la Tonnelle,” a 3000-m2 “mansion” built on 3 levels.

From the two neighborhoods, paths lead to a Roman theatre that was unearthed in 1912. Dating from the 1st century BC the theatre could seat 7000 people. Today it still serves as an event venue for theatre, chorales and dance. In the center of the Puymin site is the Théo Desplans Archaeological Museum. It contains a collection of more than 2000 everyday objects and decorative statues.

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Other reasons to visit Orange are the little shops and alleyways with all types of Frenchy things…

 It’s even more fun when you visit with a really good friend like Yetunde from Cook’n with Class who’ll show you the best places to eat.

Have you been to Orange? Tell me about it on a comment. What did you enjoy the most? 

Romans in France: The Mini-Series

Four days and nights I was glued to the TV last week. I watched the entire two-season mini-series, “Rome,” and I did it with the same intensity that I devoured “Gone With The Wind.”

Pont du Gard

Pont du Gard, Art or Architecture?

You see, ever since I moved to the south of France, I’ve been living in a Roman time warp. You’ve heard me say that many times, especially after visiting the aqueduct at Pont du Gard. Or after seeing the ruins of Roman-style villas in Orange; and the arena in Arles. So much of what is revered today in this part of France was established by Romans when they occupied “Gaul.” Miraculously, in spite of wars, weather, politics, and developers, lots of it still stands — from as long ago as 25BC and before.

Watching the HBO series saved me days of laboring through the historical novels I thought I’d have to read about  the Romans. Especially if I wanted to know about the “Caesars,” Julius and Augustus, who left such big footprints in France.

I know you’re thinking a mini-series is hardly the most factual way to learn history. Well, that’s probably true; however, I figure it’s close enough to give me a high-level view of what I wanted to know.

Now, it’s not that I didn’t study ancient history in high school and college. I did. More than that, I took four years of Latin and “translated” the “Aeneid.” Nevertheless, the mini-series had to remind me that Octavius Caesar became known as “Augustus” and that he wasn’t the “true” son of Julius, as if that makes any real difference in history. Also, I was reminded of the importance of “Gods” and “Spirits” during the period when images were carved, engraved and built in their likeness throughout the empire — including “Gaul”, the early name for what was later much of France.

Being armed with a bit of new knowledge, I’m looking forward to delving back into my tours through the south of France and taking notes on more Roman sites. Stay tuned!

For more information on Romans in Gaul check out this article on NYTimes.com

For the mini-series:

 

 

 

 

In Awe of the French: History Preserved

In awe of the French

Anytime I take a trip in France and walk among ancient Roman ruins, I am thankful to the French.

In French towns and villages where the Romans used to roam, you can actually see, feel, touch and experience the places of the past. There are arenas, forums and amphitheaters in the center of towns that are as active today as they were 2000 years ago.

Maison Carree in Nimes

Maison Carree in Nimes

 

 

 

Arena in Arles

Arena in Arles

 

Arena in Nimes

Arena in Nimes

You can climb on and over the walls, paths and steps where Caesar’s men walked.

Pont du Gard Aqueduct

Pont du Gard Aqueduct

 

You can tread the same routes where early villagers pushed their carts and lead their horses.

 

Ruins of Maison au Dauphin in Vaison-la-Romaine

Ruins of Maison au Dauphin in Vaison-la-Romaine

 

l'Arc de Triomphe in Orange

l’Arc de Triomphe in Orange

 

Thank you, France, for preserving these sites; for leaving these places open and

available to the public.

Roman Baths in Arles

Roman Baths in Arles

 

Théâtre antique d'Orange

Théâtre antique d’Orange

 

Thank you for enabling us to re-live, revere and learn from those before us. 

Jardins de la Fontaine in Nimes

Jardins de la Fontaine in Nimes

 

 

Amphitheatre in Arles

Amphitheatre in Arles

 

Tour Magne in Nimes

Tour Magne in Nimes

 

Source of the Pont du Gard in Vallée de l'eure, Uzes

Source of the Pont du Gard in Vallée de l’eure, Uzes

 

Amphitheater in Arles

Amphitheater in Arles

 

Remnants of the aqueduct at Pont du Gard

Remnants of the aqueduct at Pont du Gard

 

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Thanks to Pete Bine for contributing photos for this post!

For more information on the sights, visit these “sites”

In Nimes:

Arena

Jardins de la Fontaine

Maison Carree

Tour Magne

 

Pont du Gard

 

In Arles:

Arena

Amphitheatre

Roman Baths

 

In Orange

Théâtre antique d’Orange

l’Arc de Triomphe

 

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