Tag: Female traveling alone

Occitanie region

The Wild, Wonderful Occitanie Region: The Camargue

The Occitanie Region and the Camargue

Aigues-Mortes is at the gateway town to the Occitanie region of the Camargue. The walled city with its history of Kings and crusades is as impressive as its past.“From its earliest days, Aigues-Mortes was significant for its salt fields and its location bordering the Mediterranean Sea. (click here to read more …) 

It was last year’s visit to Aigues-Mortes, however, that made a lasting impression on the Barefoot Blogger. It was the site of my unfortunate accident on Day 8 of the 2018 Memories TourGoing back to the same location a year later was bittersweet. My fall in the street led to a year of pain and recovery. The thought of it, when I retraced the steps, brought me to tears. On a positive note, walking past the spot was a victory. I shared the moment with new friends from this year’s tour. They flanked me on all sides. Nevertheless, I carried a walking stick … just in case!

Saintes-Maries-de-la-Mer. Gypsies and Legends

To best visit the Camargue region, there’s nothing quite like a tour by Jeep. In Saintes-Maries-de-la-Mer, local guides met us to drive through the backroads they know so well. Most of the guides are lifelong residents of the Camargue. But first, a visit to the church of Sarah the Egyptian, revered by Gypsies. Read more here …

Carmargue by Jeep

High on our list of places and things to see on our Camargue safari were the white horses, bulls, and flamencos. The Parc naturel régional de Camargue is between the Mediterranean and the Rhone river delta. One-third of the Camargue is marshland, lagoons, and lakes. The rest is cultivated fields brimming at different times of the year with rice, grapes, and grain. The ecology of the area is unlike any other place in the world. White Camarguais horses roam on open fields with Camargue bulls and all eat natural feed and grasses. Read more here … 

The people of the Camargue are proud of their region, history, and their country. Our driver, Cedric, invited us to a sing-a-long while cruising through the land of horses, bulls, wine, rice, and salt.

 

Flamenco Sighting 

Finding horses and bulls was not such a challenge. Flamencos, on the other hand, were scarce.

Occitanie region

The feathered creatures that grace the marshlands to eat tiny rose-colored shrimp that give the birds their pink hue must have been at the next stop on their flight plan. I must come back. Winter is a very privileged moment since it is at this time that flamingos are the most colorful, and they perform their spectacular “courtship displays.”

 

It’s a sight I hope someday to see.

Sampling the Occitanie Region Foods and Flavors: Camarguaise-style

A quick guide to the foods of the Camargue is the land itself. As you ride through the flatlands, you see rice, vineyards, bulls, and, in some areas, salt hills and lagoons. The area has not always been so productive as today. Conservation and cooperation between the people, the government, and industry have led to an environment where all benefit.

Occitanie region

Our stop for a food tasting allowed us to get “up close and personal” with the locals.

Hills and fields of salt

I’d been looking forward to seeing the salt fields since I learned that the Camargue is the birthplace for fleur de sel. It was hard for me to believe the precious flakes of salt “bloom.” Then they’re harvested. 

Occitanie region

Walking to the top of one of the hills of salt at La Baleine, I had to stop to brush my fingers on the path and taste the salt before I believed it was true. Sometimes the truth seems more unreal than fiction.

What could match a day like this? Wait… there’s more.

Top Spots in Nice: Memories Tour Day 2

A visit to the most famous city on the Côte d’Azur is exciting enough for most travelers. To really appreciate the top spots in Nice, you need to have a good guide. For the Memories Tour, our guide Stephanie Is one of the best. She’s lived in the city more than 30 years and she’s studied it all.

Top Spots in Nice

Sightseeing on Day 2 in Nice started from our hotel, the Beau Rivage, across the street from the famous “Prom,” or Promenade des Anglais. 

It was a crystal clear day, so the views of the city and the coastline were magnificent. The sea was a brilliant blue, a sharp contrast to the white stones on the beach and the pale, “Riviera-style” architecture along the distant hillside. 

Top Spots in Nice

Promenade des Anglais

Our first stop was for a group photo at the iconic blue chair sculpture.

Memories Tour 2019

Next, a bit of history ..,

Nice

Stephanie tells the history of the 19th century Centenary Monument that commemorates Nice’s annexation to France

 

Top spots in Nice

A symbol of Nice (young girl) embracing France (the armor-glad woman) on the Centenary Monument

 

Top spots in Nice

This modern art statue beside the Promenade was originally not a favorite of the locals. The Mayor convinced them it was a brilliant representation of how the rivers and cultures of the city’s neighboring regions, through the centuries, had come together to form the extraordinary city.

Tourism has been the main industry for Nice for centuries. Many of the famous people who lived here, like Matisse, Chekhov, and Marc Chagall, came for their health and the clean air.  Italy, for example, had “bad air” because of the coal industry. 

Top spots in Nice

Old town Nice. Matisse lived at the house at the end of the street. Both Matisse and Chekhov once resided at the Beau Rivage which is at the entrance to this street.

Although much of Nice was destroyed through the years prior to the 1600s, the tie with Italy through the years is strongly visible, from the architecture to the food.

Top spots in Nice

 

Nice

 

Top spots in Nice

Place Masséna, towered over by Apollo, is the public square between old and new parts of Nice

Top Spots in Nice to Dine

Along our tour route, one of our guests, Cheryl Jamison, broke away to run into La Merenda to make reservations for lunch. The restaurant of Michelin Star chef Dominique Le Stanc is one of our food expert and talk show host’s top spots in Nice to dine when she’s here from Sante Fe.Top Spots in Nice

 

Top spots in Nice

Chef Dominique Le Stanc

chef Dominique Le Stanc

Daube à la Niçoise 

Top Spots in Nice by Bus

An extraordinary lunch at La Merenda was followed by a hop-on-hop off bus ride out and about Nice.

Top spots in Nice

Top of the bus view out of Nice to Villefranche Sur Mer

Top spots in Nice

Port of Nice

 

Top spots in Nice

Top Spots in Nice On Your Own

After a packed day of sightseeing, the tour gals were on their own to play in Nice. Some of the daring took to the skies…

Top spots in Nice

Parasailing is not included on the tour, but while in Nice … some couldn’t resist!

Top spots in Nice

 

Tomorrow…there’s more! 

Welcome to Nice

Memories Tour 2019: Welcome To Nice

Arrival day for the Memories Tour was filled with excitement, anticipation and busy last minute preparations for a welcome to Nice for our 18 guests. Patricia Sands, tour co-leader and I were anxious to put names  and faces together.

Welcome to Nice!

Our hotel for the tour, is the Beau Rivage. Set at the entrance to “old town” Nice, its location is perfect for tourists like us. Streets are filled with restaurants, shops and beautiful architecture. The front of the hotel is just across the street from the Promenade and the Mediterranean. Truly “côte d’azur.

Welcome to Nice

Vieux Nice

Welcome to Nice

Côte d’Azur and the private beach and restaurant of the Beau Rivage

“Welcome Cocktails” for our group was scheduled for 6pm. That gave us some time to scout the town before everyone arrived. Patricia took off to meet friends who live in Nice. I was able to enjoy a bit of individual time with my friend Cheryl, from Atlanta, who joined us this year. (Shout out to Lynn and Kathy, “old” friends on Memories Tour 2018.)

Welcome to Nice

Cheryl taking the first photos of Nice

Sunday Flower Market

Welcome to Nice

Sunday Flower Market in old town

 

Welcome to Nice

Vegetables and fruit at Sunday Market

 

Welcome to Nice

Buying “real” sponges

Welcome to Nice Everyone!

Welcome to Nice

Welcome Party on the terrace at the Beau Rivage

 

Welcome to Nice

Dinner by the sea

 

Nice

More of our group of 20

Ready to start the tour!

Welcome to Nice

Tomorrow it’s all about Nice! 

 

 

Welcome to Nice

Memories Tour. Here We Go Again.

Yesterday I left for Nice from Uzès for the 2019 Memories Tour of the south of France. Patricia Sands beat me there by a day after spending a few days in Paris with friends joining our tour.

2019 Memories Tour

Patricia Sands, best-selling author “Love in Provence” series

I’m looking forward to meeting my new friends, but a bit anxious because of the not-so-good memory of falling and breaking myself last year.

Yes, it’s the anniversary of my accident in Aigues Mortes where I broke my arm, shoulder, and hip. The tour was in its eight day. I’m not going to dwell on the details, or the thought of it now. But you won’t hear me refer to this year’s adventure as a “trip.” I intend to stay upright.

2019 Memories Tour

View from the Promenade in Nice

2019 Memories Tour

The eighteen ladies in this year’s excursion are joining us from places around the US and Canada. We are based in Nice for the first few days where we’ll sightsee around Nice, Antibes and the scenic coastline of the Côté d’Azur. Then we move to Arles to experience a totally different part of Provence, and to travel into the Languedoc region, now called “Occitanie.”

2019 Memories Tout

Patricia Sands, Nancy McGee (tour planner Absolutely Southern France) and the Barefoot Blogger acting up in Nice

Join us as I post the highlights of the tour from day to day.

2019 Memories Tour

Requisite Aperol Spritz to start every special occasion in the south of France

 

2019 Memories Tour

Niçoise Salade: the salad specialty of Nice. Of course it’s my first meal!

 

Nice

A wedding sighting in the streets of Vieux Nice

 

2019 Memories Tour

Mussels in garlic butter and parsley… another treat from Nice and Côté d’Azur

Memories Of The South Of France You Promised Yourself 2019

France Travel Guide

Live Like a King and Wallace Simpson

When my Brit friends from Uzès invited me to tag along with them to “live like a King” at the weekend home of the Duke of Windsor and Wallace Simpson outside Paris, I was thrilled. No one really knows how much I love and follow the British Royals. It’s a great addition to my French travels, too.

Living like a King

Queen Elizabeth Doll

I vividly remember the Coronation of Queen Elizabeth. A Queen Elizabeth doll was my prized possession.

I’m so firmly attached to the Royal Family that I went to the wedding of Will and Kate. Yes, I was one of the hundreds of thousands of spectators at Will and Kate’s wedding that glorious April day.

In fact, it was while I was on the same side of the ocean for the wedding that a friend invited me to visit in France. We spent a Saturday Market Day in Uzes. The rest is history.

France Travel Guide

Saturday Market in Uzes

Live Like a King

Nothing could have prepared me for the fact that I would spend four days and nights in the same house as the former King of England and the famous American divorcee, Wallace Simpson. Who knew I’d be stomping the same garden paths and walking the same village streets?

Living like a King

Duke of Windsor and Wallace Simpson

For any who are too young, or aren’t familiar with the story of King Edward and Wallace Simpson, it’s probably the most romantic love story in modern history (Elizabeth Taylor and Richard Burton next?) Edward was King of England after the death of his father; he was having an affair with Wallace Simpson — an American divorcee; he abdicated the throne to marry Wallace Simpson; and they “exiled” to France. If you’d like to see a new recreation of the events, you must watch the TV series “The Crown.”

Living like a King

Wedding Day of the Duke and Duchess of Windsor

Getting there

The stay at the Duke and Wallace Simpson’s country home was planned for the week following my return to France from the States. (Hopefully, you traveled with me through CDG airport; Cook’n with Class;  and Montmartre.)

After a few days in Paris, I  left for Gif-Sur-Yvette by train from Gard du Nord in Paris to meet my friends who were driving up from Uzes.

France Travel Guide  Yes, I had a ton of luggage with me from the States to haul onto the train. Luckily a lovely young man who was catching the same train gave me a hand.

France Travel Guide

Paris Gard du Nord

When I arrived at the train station in Gif-Sur-Yvette, I was “gathered” by my friends and delivered to Le Moulin de la Tuilerie, only a few miles away.

What a wonderful sight!

Living like a King

Le Moulin de la Tuilerie

Here’s a slideshow of the home, cottages, and grounds. 

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

A brief history of Le Mouline de la Tuilerie

Le Moulin de la Tuilerie was the weekend home of the Duke and Duchess and the only property the couple owned together. Their formal residence in France was in Paris, 4 Route du Champ d’Entrainement in the Bois de Bologna. The history of Le Moulin dates back to the 1500s when a working mill was on the site. The current main house was built in 1734 — as indicated by the date carved over the transom of the front door. At that time, the house and grounds were known as “Moulin Aubert.” When Edward and the Duchess took possession of Moulin Aubert in 1952, the Duchess renamed the estate after the adjacent village — ” Moulin Tuilierie.”

Le Moulin de la Tuilerie was owned and occupied by the Windsors until the Duke’s death in 1972. In 2009 it became a Landmark Trust property.

An inside look

After purchasing Le Moulin, the Windsors spent two years redecorating the interior and guest houses. With the help of renowned designer Stéphane Boudin, the home was tastefully filled with bright colors and furnishings the couple had amassed during their lives separately and together. Today, only a few of the same decorations remain.

During our stay at Le Moulin, the four couples — and me — occupied the five bedrooms in the main house. My room was quickly decided because it was the only single. For the other four bedrooms, my friends drew straws. Two couples joined me in the “servants quarters.” The remaining two were given the room of the Duchess and the room of the Duke. As you can see, there was nothing opulent about the living quarters of Le Moulin. Just utilitarian and comfortably dressed in a 1950’s way.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

The living room upstairs, on the other hand, was huge and inviting. During the time of the Windsors, the room was used primarily for entertaining. (See photos above) There are framed photographs that show the Duke and Duchess surrounded by elegantly-dressed and famous guests.

The kitchen area was added as the home morphed from a private residence to a Landmark Trust site.

Living like a King

Le Moulin de la Tuilerie

Live Like a King: Wallace Simpson Dinner Parties

Not to be outdone by royalty, my Brit friends and I put on our own “Royals Nights.”  Cocktails were served promptly at seven and dinner at eight. Two evenings we all dressed the part of Wallace Simpson and the Duke. Glam, eh?

Our cocktails, aperos, and meals were divine.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

All followed by fun and games… and just a bit of drama.

Note: Mas d’Augustine lovebirds, Jane and Gary Langston, made the best of their holiday away from the B&B.

Living like a King

Jane and Gary

Live Like a King: Out and about 

During the daytime, there was plenty of sightseeing to do.  Walking through the village of Gif-Sur-Yvette, for one.

Then a day in Paris that started with an hour-long train ride, a hop-on bus tour, and a fabulous lunch.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

The most magnificent of all — a day in Versailles!

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Then … it was time to say “goodbye”…

Living like a King

Yet another memory … 

France Travel Guide

 

Where next? Stay tuned …

France Travel Guide

5 To Do’s in Montmartre

If you’ve been to Paris before, you might not want to see the Eiffel Tower every time you return. This visit to Paris, I chose to stay in Montmartre. In just two days I got a taste of the town. And I loved it! Now I have my favorite 5 to do’s in Montmartre.

5 To Do's in MontmartreI confess, I’ve been to Montmartre before. A night at the Moulin Rouge was high on the “must do” list when I was a twenty-something in Paris for the first time with college friends. In the 60s it was pretty raunchy.  I stood in the line and walked through the  Sacré Coeur Cathedral many years later.

So what do you do in Montmartre if you’ve been to the Moulin Rouge and Sacré Coeur? Plenty!

 

5 To Do’s in Montmartre

#1  Cooking Class

Travel Guide France

Cook’n with Class Paris

Go to a cooking class at Cook’n with Class Paris. If it’s a Sunday, all the better. The Sunday Market Class includes shopping at the city market. Then you go back to the school to prepare a sumptuous meal with all the fresh ingredients. Read all about the fun experience — click here.

#2 Enjoy the Scenery

Even on a cloudy day, Montmartre is charming. Check out the patisseries and cafes along the way.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Who knows who you’ll run into? My good buddy and playwright, Silver Wainhouse! She lives near me in Uzès and she was in town for the day. 

Travel Guide France

#3 Eat the food

Take your time to find just the right spot to have lunch or a snack. I mean, is there anything quite as good as French Onion Soup — in France?  Pair that with a glass of your favorite wine and you’re just about in heaven.

Travel Guide France

One day, wandering around near Pigalle, what should appear? Le Chat Noir. Right out of a Toulouse Lautrec poster.

5 To Do's in Montmartre

Le Chat Noir

I expected Picasso or Toulouse to walk in any moment. Surely they would enjoy the cafe’s Paysanne salad — filled with duck magret and gizzards. I did!

#4 Climb the hill to Sacrè Couer

Go ahead. Even if you’ve been to the Sacrè Couer, do it again.  The views are spectacular. Yes, it’s quite a hike to the top, but there’s a lift and a small train that can take you up. If you’re around on a weekend, plan to have a coffee and croissant while sitting at a cafe near where the artists hang out. You might even snag a painting at a good price. It’s what memories are made of.
5 to do's in Montmartre

Imagine yourself here…

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

5 to do's in Montmartre

Travel Guide France

Musée de Montmartre

#5 Visit Musée de Montmartre

If you want to take a trip through Montmartre’s past — to actually see where artists, writers and sculptors such as Renoir, Émile Bernard, Suzanne Valadon, Pierre Reverdy and Demetrius Galanis actually lived and worked, visit the Musée de Montmartre. It’s tucked away on a side street at the top of Montmartre and it’s worth the stop.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Would I stay in Montmartre again? Absolutely! 

I don’t always “plug” a place that I stay when I’m traveling, but I have to give a big shout out to Le Grey Hotel. The boutique hotel is so convenient to everything I wanted to see and do on my short stay. The staff is extremely friendly and helpful. The breakfast is fresh, tasty and served late into the morning. And there is a bar and sitting room that’s cozy and inviting.

Next stop: Living Like A Royal!
Travel Guide France

Uzes visit

An Unforgettable Day in Uzès. Six Insider Tips

One of the hardest parts about visiting a new place is knowing exactly when during the year you want to go and what you want to see when you get there.

An Unforgettable Day in Uzès 

Now that the Barefoot Blogger calls Uzès“home,” here are some hints for a one day Uzés visit. On this trip you’ll have time to experience the rhythm of the town. That’s the best way to see it.

How to get to Uzes
There are a number of ways to get to Uzès by air and train. If you are arriving from the US, fly into Paris, London, or Barcelona. Check on the best fares. From each of these cities, I suggest you board a train to Nimes or Avignon, France. In fact, there’s a direct train from London to Avignon. If you prefer to fly, head for Marseilles, Nimes and Avignon, but schedules are often interrupted by airline strikes, so keep on guard for notices. (See “A Photo Guide to SNCF/TGV Trains at Paris’ CDG Airport-Updated”)

When you arrive in Nimes or Avignon, there is bus service to Uzès with regional buses that depart on a regular, reliable schedule. The bus station in Uzès is in the middle of town, number #6 on the map below, close to most destinations in the historic district.

How to Get to Uzès” from other locations.

 Tip #1 

Visit on a Saturday or a Wednesday for a market day in Uzès.

Both the Saturday and Wednesday markets in Uzès are centered in the Place aux Herbes. It’s at  #17 on the map below. Start out early in the morning on whichever market day you choose because the crowds start arriving around 10am. In the summer, you will be shoulder-to-shoulder with other tourists by noon.

An Unforgettable Day in Uzès

Map of Historic Uzès

Saturday Market – When I visited Saturday Market in Uzès for the first time, I fell in love with the town. In fact, Saturday’s one of my favorite days of the week living here. The market vendors are in the Place aux Herbes with fruits and vegetables, cheeses, and all the flavors and foods that make this part of France so wonderful. Throughout the plaza and along the main avenue that circles the historic part of town, more vendors line up side by side selling men and women’s clothing, shoes, jewelry, hats and more.  Musicians are on almost every corner playing French, Spanish and even Dixieland sounds. 

An Unforgettable Day in Uzès

Musicians in Uzès

An Unforgettable Day in Uzès

Musicians in Uzès

An Unforgettable Day in Uzès

Claude the Cheese Man

An Unforgettable Day in Uzès

“Cat” with beautiful leather bracelets, located on the main street of town.

Wednesday Market – The market on Wednesdays in a scaled-down version of the weekend event. Most of the vendors are selling food items that are local to the region. The market is mainly in the Plaza aux Herbes which gives visitors a chance to get a good look at the permanent shops located along the main streets and alleyways. 

An Unforgettable Day in Uzès

French Farmer

Tip #2

Stop for lunch at one of the many restaurants along the boulevard or plazas.

For an unforgettable day in Uzès, take your choice of restaurants along the main avenue for lunch. Make yourself comfortable, like the French do, and take a long — sometimes two hour — break to eat, drink wine and relax. Most restaurants serve from noon to 2pm. If it’s a very busy day in town, scope out a place you want to stop for lunch before market, then make a reservation for “dejeuner”.

Uzes visit

Map of Uzès historic area

Tip

Stroll through the historic area (map above).

There are so many things to enjoy seeing on an unforgettable day in Uzès …  like the Medieval Garden, the Fenestrelle tower, and the Cathedral of Saint Théodorit with it’s classic French organ. Pull out your camera and capture some amazing photos that the people and town provide. Narrow, cobblestone streets lined with 12th century architecture are everywhere.

An Unforgettable Day in Uzès

An Unforgettable Day in Uzès

Tip #4

Visit a special hideaway frequented by Uzès insiders: Valle de l’Eure.  It’s not easy to find but it’s worth the venture.

If you want to pick up a snack or a picnic for the park, Gaiffier’s Green Grocer is on the way. Ask there for directions to the entrance to Valle de l’Eure which is just down the road toward San Quentin la Poterie. There’s a stone archway on the righthand side of the road that leads into the parklike area. The public swimming pool and tennis courts are on the left. Follow the path that’s beside the tennis courts until it ends at the “stairway” shown below. It’s a long way down the steps, but as they say in France: “oh la,la!”

Uzes visit

Gaiffier Green Grocer in Uzès

 Tip #5

Make your way back to the center of all the action — Place aux Herbes — to enjoy the fountain, shop! and take in all the sights and sounds around you. On market days, the vendors are out of the way and the plaza is back in time for you to enjoy a glass of wine, a pastis or an aperitif before dinner.

Day in Uzès

Fountain at Place aux Herbes

 Tip #6

Dinner at a restaurant with an outdoor patio.

If you can stay long enough for a lovely dinner under the skies, there are several nice restaurants with outdoor patio/gardens. If there’s a crowd in town, you’ll need to make a reservation in advance. They will welcome you anytime around 7pm, but not before. One of my favorite places is Les Comptoir Sept. The food is excellent and the service is superb.

Uzes visit

Foie grae entree at Le Comptoir Sept

Uzes visit

Scallops with risotto

Enjoy! Come Back Often!

For  more information about these favorite spots, check out these posts for your unforgettable day in Uzès.

Saturday market: Virtually real time

Tasty Bites in Uzes

IMG_4894

Marseille is for Foodies

Marseille is for Foodies

Marseille wasn’t high on my list of places to visit. A weekend spent there to celebrate the birthday of a dear friend from Uzès totally changed my mind. On top of being an incredibly beautiful city with lovely, welcoming people, Marseille is for foodies like me.

I’ve been to Marseille on several occasions since living in Uzès. Once to the warehouse district to claim a shipment and more than once to the airport. Neither area offers the best of the city. It was hearing that Marseille is for foodies, especially bouillabaisse, that called me back.

Is it food that makes Marseille so appealing to millions of travelers?

Marseille is for Foodies

Food in Marseille is as varied as the people: French, Italian, Spanish, Indian, Middle Eastern, African, North and South and Central Americans and more. Restaurants and cafes are on nearly every street and corner. There are over 1000 listed in TripAdvisor, including fifteen Michelin star restaurants. Along Le Vieux Port, where we stayed for the weekend, there were places to eat lined side by side.

My first meal in Marseille was a medley of seafoods at La Brasserie du Port. The waterfront restaurant was right below our hotel, Grand Hôtel Beauvau Marseille Vieux-Port.  The fresh, beautifully prepared seafood and the service couldn’t have been better. The view from the terrace of the brasserie — the architectural masterpiece by Norman Foster against the background of the ancient port — was stunning.

Marseille is for Foodies

The birthday girl’s selection for meals on her special day was eclectic and international — Indian for lunch and Columbian for dinner.  Palais du Maharaja,  chosen from TripAdvisor, proved to be the perfect place to satisfy our appetites for Indian food.

… Indian Food

… Columbian Food

Discovering Columbia tapas at Tapas La Picadita  turned out to be one of the best food finds of the weekend. The menu, the preparation and the friendly staff were so special that we came back the next night for more.

Marseille is for Foodies

… “Little Istanbul”

Even though it rained during part of our stay in Marseille, it didn’t keep us from wandering the streets near Le Vieux Port. A shop overflowing with bins and bags of Turkish delicacies stopped us in our tracks. We loaded up on dried fruits, spices, teas and candies to take back with us. And we laughed a lot!

Marseille is for Foodies

… Street Food

Somehow the rain in Marseille made the atmosphere even more picturesque and interesting. Food vendors and cafes were open for business… and happy to see us .

 

One stop for tea and coffee ended up in a karaoke! The proprietor thought I looked like Petula Clark. We all started singing “Downtown”! What fun!

Marseille is for Foodies

… Bouillabaisse!

I was really looking forward to a bowl of bouillabaisse. Who can go to Marseille without tasting it?

You need to book reservations two days in advance for some restaurants to prepare this Marseille favorite for you. Be sure to plan ahead. We chose to try the bouillabaisse at Grand Bar des Goudes in Le Goudes, a  village outside Marseille. The tiny town is in a district of Marseille on the way to the Calanques. Little did we know that it would take a couple of hours to drive to Le Goudes on a Sunday.  It didn’t help that throngs of people in cars, on bikes and on foot were heading that way after three days cooped up in the rain. Yes, we were late for our reservations, but the drive along the winding road and the views of Marseille were worth the hassle.

 

The view of the fishing harbor from the restaurant in Goudes was pretty special too.

Marseille is for Foodies

 

Back to the main attraction — the bouillabaisse. 

Bouillabaisse is a provençal fish stew traditionally created by the fishermen of Marseilles. It was concocted as a way to use up the bony rockfish they’d caught along the Calanques that they couldn’t sell.

According to the Michelin Guide Vert, “the four essential elements of a true bouillabaisse are the presence of rascasse, the freshness of the fish; olive oil, and an excellent saffron.” American chef and author, Julia Child, wrote in her book, My Life in France: “to me the telling flavor of bouillabaisse comes from two things: the Provençal soup base — garlic, onions, tomatoes, olive oil, fennel, saffron, thyme, bay, and usually a bit of dried orange peel — and, of course, the fish — lean (non-oily), firm-fleshed, soft-fleshed, gelatinous, and shellfish.”

Not all bouillabaisse is created equal. The variety I sampled was missing some of the shellfish. I’m taking the fact that there may be the “perfect” bouillabaisse waiting for me. A good enough reason to return to Marseille, don’t you agree?

 

Did you know there’s a proper way to serve and eat bouillabaisse?

Have you been to Marseille? Do you have a favorite restaurant? Where’s the best place for the bouillabaisse? Please let me know. I will return! 

 

 

For more about Marseille:

The Doors and Windows of Marseille

Marseille is for Foodies

Marseilles: A Stormy Past. A Brilliant Future.

 

 

 

sing in a rock band

I Just Want To Sing in a Rock Band

Before the Barefoot Blogger ever dreamed of living in France, I longed to sing in a rock band.

No joke. It’s been my suppressed desire to sing in a rock band. That and wanting to live in a ‘hippy’ van on the beach. So when the Bad Girls Groove Band came to town while I was visiting Sete, I fell in love with them.  They are everything I ever wanted to be … and more! The girls are not only drop-dead gorgeous, but they also have that kind of glamor that’s a flashback to the past.

Revisit the first time I met the Bad Girls’ Groove Band in Sete in 2015…

 

sing in a rock band

Bad Girls 2015

 

sing in a rock band

 

And the Bad Girls are a whole lot of Rock n’ Roll!

sing in a rock band

Bad Girls Groove Band 2015

 

The weekend of the Saint Louis Festival in Sete, the Bad Girls Groove Band of London ruled the main stage. 

 

It’s no wonder!

Here’s a quick visit with the Bad Girls Groove Band in Sete on the main stage and at St. Clair’s. Same time, next year! (Fingers crossed!)

 

The Bad Girls in Sete

Barefooting in Sete, France

It’s St. Louis Festival in Sete. Time for Water Jousting!

7 Reasons To Visit Sete This Year

 

 

 

Fête Votive: The Bulls are Here!

Oh my!  Every August the streets of Uzés turn from business into a carnival. It’s Fête Votive!   Bulls run in the streets;  brass bands with men and women in colorful uniforms “oomp-pa-pa” through the village; and parades with spectacular floats fill the place with music and lights.

The Uzés Fête Votive schedule goes on for six days. This is the running of the Bulls — Day One.

Fête Votive

 People line the “main” street of Uzes waiting for the entertainment to start.

Horse and riders from the Camargue wait for the action to start.

Horses and cowboys from the Camargue ready themselves for the action.

  Fête Votive   Fête Votive

Fête Votive

They know there’s an important, dangerous job ahead.

Fête Votive

 Horses are restless. Even so, this one made a special effort to pose for the camera.

 

Fête Votive   Fête Votive   Fête Votive

Handlers were listening for the signal to let out their cargo of Camargue bulls.

Fête Votive

Fête Votive

Fête Votive

Fête Votive

Your guess what this was about?

The crowds were anxious.

Fête Votive     Fête Votive  

Fête Votive

Then, in a flash, the truck gate was down and the bulls dashed out in a fury  … faster than the eye … and faster than my camera. The bulls were released in such a hurry … three of them at once … that I thought I had missed it all.

 

Fête Votive

You do see the bull? Right?

 In  just a few minutes a buzz from the excited crowd signaled the bulls were on the way back!

Fête Votive

Oops! Too fast. Missed again.

Fête Votive

Note: Bull on the bottom right .. or leg of bull.

Fête Votive

Thinking I had totally missed getting a shot of the bulls, I glanced around and saw that the young people standing near me — Arnaud and his friends from Normandy —  had captured  the action on video.  They were more than happy to share it for the blog.

(Thank you Arnaud!)

 

Yes, it was over that fast… 2+ seconds!

 What I didn’t know was that chasing the bulls up and down the boulevard goes on for an hour. Up and down, down and up.

Fête Votive

And if you walk down the street, there are better places to view the spectacle.

Fête Votive

After an hour of bulls and horses running up and down the street, I was able to catch a few decent shots.  Mind you, they  come storming down from the boulevard in a mass of horses with riders, bulls, and people chasing the bulls. Then they’re gone.

 

Fête Votive   Fête Votive

Fête Votive

Bulls running in Uzes

Fête Votive

Yes,  they were that close!

Fête Votive

If you wonder what it feels like to be standing in the middle of a street with horses and bulls headed your way, check out the video.

12 Ways To Calm The Overactive Mind

CDG Airport

Lost at CDG: How to Find Your Airport Hotel

Have you ever been lost at CDG Airport (Charles de Gaulle) trying to find your way to the hotel where you’ve reserved a room? I have. 

When I head back to the US from Uzés for my family visits, I try to stay at a hotel at CDG the night before the flight. It’s my way of dealing with travel stress. Until this trip, however, I’ve been lost trying to find the way to the hotel. More stress…

This time I was determined to figure it out. It couldn’t be that hard. Besides, what else was I going to do to spend the 24 hours before my next day flight to Atlanta? So I walked slowly through the train station; I read all the signs; and I took photos along the way. Now, if I forget next visit, hopefully, this will help.

Here we go … from the CDG trains (Gare) to one of these airport hotels: Citizen M, Hilton, Novotel or Ibis (If you’re staying at a CDG hotel other than these, I’m afraid this guide won’t help you.)

lost at CDG

 

lost at CDG

Trains arrive at CDG on this lower level. Ride the escalator up to the next level. If you have too many bags for the escalator, walk behind it, and you’ll see signs for the elevator (Ascenseur)

 

lost at CDG

At the top of the escalator

 

lost at CDG

Enter the terminal

 

lost at CDG

You’re here. Now look for the escalator to your left.

 

lost at CDG

Take this escalator up to the level with the big blue display board.

 

lost at CDG

 

lost at CDG

Look at the second sign, the one on the left. It’s showing you the way to the airport shuttle … see close up below.

 

lost at CDG

Airport shuttle sign looks like a little train on a track. Follow the sign and go left here.

 

lost at CDG

Up the escalator

 

lost at CDG

On this level, it gets a little confusing. Relax. Look to your right for the hallway with signs that have the little train on the track. That’s the way to the airport shuttle.

 

lost at CDG

Down again

You’ve made it to the shuttle. But there are two tracks … and everyone’s in a hurry…which way to go??? Here’s a little secret … you can’t go the wrong way!! Both shuttles go back and forth along the same route. 

lost at CDG

If you go the wrong way, sit back and relax. You’ll get to the right stop… Roissypôle.

lost at CDG

 

You’re almost there! But it does continue to be a bit confusing. There’s a lot of construction going on at Roissypôle.

Roissypôle

Exit the terminal. An IBIS hotel is right there. For others,  look for a sign to the left of where the buses are stationed.

 

Roissypôle

Hotel sign!

 

Citizen M at CDG

There it is! My favorite … Citizen M. The Hilton and others are off this same walkway.

 

Citizen M at CDG

Citizen M

 

Citizen M at CDG

At Citizen M, there’s always a friendly, welcoming host to meet you.

 

For more about “lost at CDG” and help navigating around the airport and train station: Finding Your Way Through Paris’ CDG

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

heat wave in uzès

Scorching Heat Wave in Uzès

What do Uzètians do when there’s a heat wave in Uzès and it’s a scorching 107 degrees (41.7°c) outside?

If you’re wondering how the heat is affecting Uzès, let’s look at the places people always gather. Join me on a walk around town.

Looks like Christina from the teddy bear shop” and David, real estate agent extraordinaire, are out today. Of course, the Barefoot Blogger had to check if it was hot enough to fry an egg!

heat wave in uzès

How bad is the heat wave in Uzès on tourists?

A few years ago when the high in town was 99, I thought THAT was hot.. read more … .For those who live in hot-weather areas around the world, ninety degrees is not so bad for summer. In France, when it’s this hot, it breaks records.Century-old buildings with thick walls help to insulate homes and businesses from the intense heat, so air conditioning is scarce. There are some tried and true ways the French try to keep their indoor spaces cooler.

But what about the tourist?

They line up for ice cream. 

 

IMG_3254

 

IMG_3252

 

IMG_3256

 

They hang out at Place aux Herbes eating ice cream. 

Fountain at Place aux Herbes, Uzes

Fountain at Place aux Herbes, Uzes

They sit around outdoor fans that blow cool mist.

IMG_3258

IMG_3260

 

They enjoy people-watching with friends while sipping on cool beverages.

IMG_3271

They look for water fountains where they can play.


IMG_3265

Tourists seem to love to shop when it’s hot.  It’s often cooler on the inside of a store than it is on the streets.

Tourist shopping in Uzes

Tourist shopping in Uzes

 

There are plenty of irresistible things to buy .. and a sale going on!

 

 

Some tourists patiently wait on others who are shopping.

IMG_3267

 

On the other hand, some tourists who wait are not so patient.

IMG_3283

What does the Barefoot Blogger do when it’s hot?

I “play” at one of my favorite stores.

 

 

 

 

 

3 Days in Paris

3 Days in Paris

When it’s your first visit to Paris, how do you decide what to do? There are so many ways you can go, things to see in just 3 days in Paris. 

Last year this time, I was in Paris celebrating a landmark birthday with one of my best friends from North Carolina. It was her first time in Paris. So, of course, we had to make the rounds of the places she had heard and dreamed about.

The Paris tour gave me a chance to see Notre Dame for the last time in its glory. We did something I’ve never done, too. We rode the elevator all the way to the top of the Eiffel Tower. What a thrill! And what a fascinating story about the tower’s early beginnings.

Did you know the people of Paris disliked the Eiffel Tower when it was built? They thought it was ghastly. Not until it was used as a watchtower during the War did it gain appreciation. Imagine Paris without the Eiffel Tower! 

3 Days in Paris

Enjoy!

Happy Birthday, Ricki!

For more about Paris visit these posts on Barefoot Blogger

Christmas in Paris

Paris Night Lights

Paris: Fiddlers Rock the Château

Paris Through Your Eyes

A Photo Guide to the SNCF/TGV Trains at Paris’ CDG Airport

Travel Tips for Passing Through CDG Paris

Look What’s Cooking on Sunday in Paris

France Travel Guide: Living Like a King and Wallace Simpson

Travel Guide France: 5 Things To Do in Montmartre

 

3 days in Paris

Heat wave in Uzès Go to Corsica

Heat Wave! Go To Corsica

We’re having a heat wave in Uzès this week. It’s supposed to be close to 105° (41°C). The French call it “la canicule.” All I can say is “it’s cooler in Corsica.” 

Always a little cooler than the mainland of France, Corsica is a popular destination for those wanting to escape the heat. Take a look and imagine yourself there…

 

Want to know more about Corsica? You have to Travel Corsica to believe how much the terrain of an island can change within a short drive. The contrast between Corsica’s coastline with soft-curvy coves and the island’s mountain region with snow-capped mountains is remarkable. The contrast between Corsica’s coastline with soft-curvy coves and the island’s mountain region with snow-capped mountains is remarkable. With a week to visit the French island, I thought it would be a simple task to drive to the major towns — Bastia, Ajaccio, Corte, Calvi, Saint Florent, Porto Vecchio, and Bonifacio. Not so. Now I’ve learned you measure the distance between towns in Corsica by hours, not miles.  Most roads are narrow and winding and go through populated towns and/or commercial areas. It can take you two hours to travel 15 miles (25km). That’s why I ended up seeing only a portion of the southern half of the island. Most of my time in Corsica was spent in the southern part of the island at the beaches around Porto Vecchio and in the town of Bonifacio. And because I spent half the time at the beach or in the swimming pool. The Travel Corsica trip was a beach holiday, too. The day I took the mountainous route through the Corsica Regional Nature Park and visited Corte. Another day, Sartene. The scenery in each of the places could not have been more different…(read on)…

 

go to Corsica

Fete de la Musique

Fête de la Musique: Street Dancing in Uzès

Who doesn’t love a music festival? It’s Fete de la Musique in Uzès again and everyone’s out dancing in the streets.

Fête de la Musique 2019

Click here for a flashback to one of the Barefoot Blogger’s first Fête de la Musique moments … 

Hello Summer. It’s Music Time in Uzes!

 

 

pont du gard show

Pont du Gard. Lights, Cameras, Action!

Each year The ancient Roman aqueduct Pont du Gard is alive with an exciting sound and light show. 

Jean-Jacques Rousseau, one of the most influential thinkers and writers of the eighteenth century was overwhelmed when he visited Pont du Gard. Imagine what he would say if he witnessed it today.

“I had been told to go and see the Pont du Gard; I did not fail to do so. It was the first work of the Romans that I had seen. I expected to see a monument worthy of the hands which had constructed it. This time the object surpassed my expectation, for the only time in my life. Only the Romans could have produced such an effect. The sight of this simple and noble work struck me all the more since it is in the middle of a wilderness where silence and solitude render the object more striking and the admiration more lively; for this so-called bridge was only an aqueduct. One asks oneself what force has transported these enormous stones so far from any quarry, and what brought together the arms of so many thousands of men in a place where none of them live. I wandered about the three storeys of this superb edifice although my respect for it almost kept me from daring to trample it underfoot. The echo of my footsteps under these immense vaults made me imagine that I heard the strong voices of those who had built them. I felt myself lost like an insect in that immensity. While making myself small, I felt an indefinable something that raised up my soul, and I said to myself with a sigh, “Why was I not born a Roman!”

 

More about Pont du Gard:

Pont du Gard, France: Architecture or Art?

Summer 2019 don’t miss the Pont du Gard light show:  “The Bridge at Dusk” 

wine tasting and canal cruising

Wine Tasting and Cruising Canal du Midi

Canal cruising is more than floating along slowly in a barge. Wine tasting and cruising was the perfect way to spend the day on the Athos Canal du Midi.

The itinerary for our first full day on the Athos Canal du Midi barge took us to the House of Noilly Prat in Marseillan for a wine tasting. The famous vermouth company, owned by Martini & Rossi, was developed by French herbalist Joseph Noilly from Lyon in 1813. Noilly Prat was officially created when Louis Noilly became business partners with his son-in-law, Claudius Prat. The company moved to Marseillan in the 1850s because of its ideal location.  Proximity to Marseille enabled easy shipping and the sea spray from the coastal location aided in oxidizing and aging the wine.

The location was perfect for wine tasting and for starting our cruise of the Canal du Midi, too!

wine tasting and canal cruising

Noilly Prat is only a few steps from the Marseillan harbor

 Noilly Pratt’s three variants of vermouth is made totally in the factory we visited — except for bottling. Our tour followed each process.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Wine Tasting and Canal Cruising

Entering the Canal du Midi

From the harbor in Marseillan the Athos canal barge approached the entrance to the Canal du Midi. It wasn’t long before we were at the first of the canal locks we would encounter over the next days of our cruise.

wine tasting and canal cruising

Route of the Athos Canal du Midi Cruise

 

Enjoy the video and the ride!

wine tasting and canal cruising

Athos Canal du Midi Cruise

Canal Cruising in France: Aboard the Athos Canal du Midi Luxury Barge

If visiting the south of France is in your future, put an Athos Canal du Midi Cruise at the top of your “bucket” list.

Kid you not. My Canal du Midi cruise on the luxury hotel barge Athos is fast becoming one of my most memorable experiences in France. Where else could you go on private tours of quaint and romantic French towns and villages; eat the most authentic and delicious French cuisine, including wines and cheeses selected just for you; cruise on a historic winding canal; experience wildlife within reach, and be waited on hand and foot?

Athos Canal du Midi Cruise

Canal du Midi Cruise

For a full week I was a guest on the Athos du Midi which is owned and managed by Dannielle and Julian Farrant. The Athos is their “Love Boat.” Dannielle — a Canadian, and Julian — a Brit, met and married while working aboard the canal barge over twenty years ago.

Athos Canal du Midi Cruise

While Dannielle and Julian are busy taking care of business on shore these days, they leave the five-person crew of the Athos to wine, dine and attend to passengers onboard the 100-foot barge (30.48 meters). The Athos is one of the largest barges on the canal.

Port of Origin: Marseillan

Marseillan is the port of departure for most of the week-long cruises. By lucky coincidence we were in Marseillan for the celebration of the reopening of the port. As crowds gathered around the harbor, the town was lively with music when we arrived. By dark there was a spectacular fireworks just feet away from us.  Quite a welcome for our first day on Athos Canal Midi cruise!

Guests aboard the Athos were Heidi and Tim from New Zealand; and Canadians from Victoria: Michelle and Dave. Ten passengers on the Athos are the norm, so right away, we knew our holiday with only five was going to be very special. We were going to be pampered.

Aboard the Athos Canal du Midi Luxury Barge

Arriving in Beziers by car, I was driven to the port by Mathieu, our tour guide. Other passengers stayed overnight in Beziers and met us at the Athos. The crew welcomed guests with what was to become a standard: friendly, gracious service and lots of attention.

Athos Canal du Midi Cruise

Onboard the Athos the crew met the five passengers with champagne and canapés

 

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Dinner is served!

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Yes! There’s more … more canal cruise adventures and food! Stay tuned …

Join the Barefoot Blogger on FaceBook, Twitter, Pinterest and Instagram for more photos and fun on the Athos Canal du Midi. 

Athos Canal du Midi Cruise

A Foodie Holiday in Antibes

Antibes has a special attraction for me. Perhaps it’s the architecture and the narrow colorful avenues. It could be the quaint little hotel where I stay that’s so close to little shops and outdoor cafes, yet so hidden away. On my most recent visit, the main attraction was the food. Here’s a look at Antibes restaurant favorites

The past three years, I’ve made a long weekend pilgrimage to Antibes with my good buddies Paula and Rich. This year we added our friend, Trish, to the party.

Before we left for Antibes, Trish innocently asked, “what do we do in Antibes?”

Paula and I, almost in unison, replied: “absolutely nothing.”

We meant it. The annual getaway is our chance to be together in a totally relaxed atmosphere — before the onslaught of summer visitors, traveling and activities in and around Uzès.

Usually we spend a part of a day exploring something we haven’t seen or done around Antibes. Last year it was the Fete Voiles. This year we walked to and around the park at Fort Carreé.

Most of our time in Antibes, we ate. A lot.

Hungry? Read on at your own risk!

Antibes restaurant favorites

Lunch (déjuener) at Le Don Juan is becoming a regular stop on visits to Antibes. Always good! The gnocchi with veggies was a perfect choice for our vegetarian friend.

Antibes restaurant favorites

Le Don Juan for dèjeuner was a treat with ancienne tomato salad, veggie-stuffed farci, calamari, and gnocchi with vegetables

Dinner at Autour du Jardin was even more special with friends from House Hunters International. We lucked out that Erin, Stewart and kids were visiting Antibes at the same time. (Can I call these adorable young adults “kids?”) 

Antibes restaurant favorites

Autour du Jardin, Antibes with the kids, Paula and Erin, Stewart and the Barefoot Blogger. A fancy caprese salad and lemon tart.

 

Dinner at Côte Terroir meant eating fancy food that really tasted as good as it looked. Because it was a windy night, there was no outside seating. Who cared? The service and foods were impeccable. 

 

Antibes restaurant favorites

Côte Terroir, Antibes muse bouche parmesan “pops”; soft boiled egg with nut-crumb wrap and jambon; gambas (shrimp) risotto, and the chef’s take on pavlova with mango

 

Final night in Antibes means dining out on the plage (beach) in Juan-les-Pins. This year we discovered Le Ruban Bleu. Our “regular” restaurant had disappeared. Seems like there are some restaurants on city property, some spots are owned by the French government. The state owned ones are closed. Go figure? 

Antibes restaurant favorites

Le Ruban Bleu in Juan-les-Pins offered the seafood specialties we were craving. Fish soup, pasta with clams and a fancy mixed vegetarian salad

 

Light lunch and drinks at The Brooklyn was a great find. Located along the busy byway to the harbor, the cafe was buzzing. No wonder! Who could resist this smiling waiter, a bento box for our vegetarian, and a giant Jack Daniels burger. The Colonel cocktail (citron sorbet with vodka) was pretty amazing, too. 

 

Antibes restaurant favorites

 

Want to know more about Antibes? Check out these posts:

The Doors and Windows of Antibes

Antibes Again? It Just Gets Better

Antibes in 2 Days: Moonlight and Absinthe

See more of Antibes on Pinterest … click here!

Dordogne's Plus Beaux Villages

Dordogne’s Plus Beaux Villages: Beynac-et-Cazenac and Castlenaud-la-Chapelle

Recently I challenged myself to visit all the “Plus Beaux Villages de France” — France’s most beautiful villages. Perhaps I should have done a bit more research before making such a statement. There are 156 official villages with the “Plus Beaux” distinction. Even though France is only the size of Texas, it’s a big place!

Dordogne's Plus Beaux Villages

Now that I’m a bit more realistic about the “task” (albeit, a pleasure) it’s more feasible for me to do one region at a time.

Plus Beaux Villages by Region

There are 13 regions in France. The region where I’ve visited the most beaux villages in Aquitaine. It’s also where there are the most “official” Plus Beaux Villages in France — in Dordogne.

 Dordogne’s Plus Beaux Villages

Three years ago a hometown friend that I hadn’t seen in 40 years came to visit me in France. While here we entertained ourselves by driving from Uzès to Dordogne. Like typical tourists we focused on the area around the Dordogne river: the “classic” Dordogne: picturesque villages, medieval castles, limestone cliffs and caves with prehistoric drawings. The French call it “le Pèrigord.”

During our week-long tour we stopped at two of the most well known beaux villages in Dordogne — Domme and La Roque-Gageac. To learn about these villages read on here…

On the way back from my recent visit to the States, I intentionally stopped in Dordogne to see four of the beaux villages on my list: Beynac-et-Cazenac, Castlenaud-la-Chapelle, Monpazier, and St. Jean-de-Côle.

A Day in Beynac-et-Cazenac and Castlenaud-la-Chapelle

Because they’re so close together, you can visit both of these villages in a day. Admittedly, I lingered over lunch in Beynac so I didn’t see as much as I could have. But then, relaxing to enjoy your surroundings is part of the journey, too.

Beynac-et-Cazenac

If you dream about France, like I do, you’ve seen Beynac-et-Cazenac in your dreams. It’s a fairytale French villages perched above the Dordogne river, complete with narrow cobblestone streets, storybook houses and a stately castle at the top. You would expect Cinderella and her prince to appear at any moment.

Like all Plus Beaux Villages de France, Beynac is tiny. The max population for beaux villages is 2000. In 2015 Beynac had 552 residents.

It takes only a few hours to walk around town and through the castle. If you’re driving you can find parking at several levels on the way up to the castle. It’s a pretty steep climb if you stop at the bottom and you only want to visit the castle.

I strongly advise you plan to spend enough time in Beynac to stroll the streets and enjoy the medieval architecture. There are not many places that are as original and as well maintained.

They say the castle, “Château de Beynac”, is the most authentic example of a feudal fortress in the Pèrigord. Towering above the river and valley, it is a reminder of legendary conquerors like King Richard “the Lionhearted” who walked this very courtyard and within the stone walls.  Likewise, it is a shrine to wars that raged through Dordogne for over nine centuries.

If you visit Beynac on I sunny day like I did, enjoy a lovely meal with a “to die for” view of the river at La Terrasse des Chateaux.

Castlenaud-la-Chapelle

Literally down the road from Beynac-et-Cazenac is the plus beaux village Castlenaud-la-Chapelle. The magnificent castle, Château de Castelnaud, soars above the Céou River valley as if to announce “Look at me!”

Dordogne's Plus Beaux Villages

The proud castle, like its neighbor in Beynac, was the site of numerous wars and confrontations, including the Hundred Years War. It changed occupants between the French and the English seven times. During its history, the castle was burned to the ground, rebuilt, abandoned during the French Revolution, then used as a stone quarry. During WWII the fortress gave shelter to French resistance groups. Between 1974 and 2005 it was restored to its near-original state.

Dordogne's Plus Beaux Villages

Today the castle is one of the most visited spots in Dordogne, especially by families with children. A museum features medieval weapons from all over Europe. In the village perigordine style houses with high-pitched roofs are tightly terraced along narrow streets.

Dordogne's Plus Beaux Villages

When visiting Castlenaud-la-Chapelle there’s a large parking lot at the top. You can walk directly to the castle from there. That view alone will make your day!

Dordogne's Plus Beaux Villages

Stay tuned for photos and an overview of the visit to Monpazier and St. Jean du Côle. To read about the earlier tour of Domme and La Roque-Gageac, click here

Want to see more photos? Join the Barefoot Blogger on Pinterest

Dordogne's Plus Beaux Villages

 

 

 

%d bloggers like this: