Tag: Flood in south of France

Fall … In Love With Provence

The Barefoot Blogger’s mid-week drive into Provence inspired some stunning photos to share. This time of year brings out my very favorite colors in the crayon box.

Fall in Provence

Fall in Provence

Plane trees along the drive into Provence

 

Fall in Provence

 

 

Fall in Provence

Outside Lourmarin

 

 

Fall in Provence

Bonnieux

 

 

 

 

Fall in Provence

 

 

 

Fall in Provence

 

Fall in Provence

 

 

Fall in Provence

 

Fall in Provence

 

 

 

Fall in Provence

 

 

Roussillon

 

Fall in Provence

 

 

Fall in Provence

 

Thanks to the friends who help color my world. 

Fall in Provence

Rich and Paula in Roussillon along with new Barefoot Blogger friend, Aggie.

Note: Most photos picture Roussillon

IMG_8106

 

 

 

Romans in France: The Mini-Series

Four days and nights I was glued to the TV last week. I watched the entire two-season mini-series, “Rome,” and I did it with the same intensity that I devoured “Gone With The Wind.”

Pont du Gard

Pont du Gard, Art or Architecture?

You see, ever since I moved to the south of France, I’ve been living in a Roman time warp. You’ve heard me say that many times, especially after visiting the aqueduct at Pont du Gard. Or after seeing the ruins of Roman-style villas in Orange; and the arena in Arles. So much of what is revered today in this part of France was established by Romans when they occupied “Gaul.” Miraculously, in spite of wars, weather, politics, and developers, lots of it still stands — from as long ago as 25BC and before.

Watching the HBO series saved me days of laboring through the historical novels I thought I’d have to read about  the Romans. Especially if I wanted to know about the “Caesars,” Julius and Augustus, who left such big footprints in France.

I know you’re thinking a mini-series is hardly the most factual way to learn history. Well, that’s probably true; however, I figure it’s close enough to give me a high-level view of what I wanted to know.

Now, it’s not that I didn’t study ancient history in high school and college. I did. More than that, I took four years of Latin and “translated” the “Aeneid.” Nevertheless, the mini-series had to remind me that Octavius Caesar became known as “Augustus” and that he wasn’t the “true” son of Julius, as if that makes any real difference in history. Also, I was reminded of the importance of “Gods” and “Spirits” during the period when images were carved, engraved and built in their likeness throughout the empire — including “Gaul”, the early name for what was later much of France.

Being armed with a bit of new knowledge, I’m looking forward to delving back into my tours through the south of France and taking notes on more Roman sites. Stay tuned!

For more information on Romans in Gaul check out this article on NYTimes.com

For the mini-series:

 

 

 

 

12 Things You’ll Miss in France This Year

The Barefoot Blogger’s “Must” Hit List
Follow on Bloglovin

In case you haven’t heard, this is the year to visit France. The euro to US dollar is at a twelve-year low. If you don’t already have your bags packed, here are a few things you’ll surely miss staying at home.

#1

Sunset on the French Rivera

Sunset on the French Rivera

 

#2

 

Un-shuttered windows and flowerpots

Un-shuttered windows and pots with bright flowers

 

#3

 

Narrow, winding, ancient village streets

Narrow, winding, ancient streets

 

#4

 

Morning breaking over stone skycaps

Morning breaking over stone skyscapes

 

#5

 

Vineyards and poppies and chateaus  with tile roofs

Vineyards and poppies and chateaus with tile roofs

 

#6

 

Bright lights on sparkling water

Brilliant lights and sparkling waters

 

#7

 

IMG_0016_2

Quiet walks on sleepy canals

 

 

#8

 

Finding wonder through peepholes

Finding wonder through peepholes

 

#9

 

Music in the streets

Music in the streets

 

#10

 

Busy sidewalks and Saturday Markets

Sidewalk cafes and Saturday Markets

 

#11

 

Majestic cathedrals

Majestic cathedrals

 

 

HISTORY

HISTORY

Where will it be?

2015-03-30 09.35.02

 

 

 

 

Halloween Train to the Cevennes

Cevennes Halloween Train

There’s nothing like a ride on a train through the Cevennes with a gazillion Halloween goblins!

Now that Languedoc-Roussillon has become the “in” place to visit in the world, there will be lots of tourist on the way. One adventure that’s too good to miss is a Cevennes Halloween train ride. Luckily, when I showed up to take the ride, there were scores of school children enjoying a break from school. What fun it was to watch them in their Halloween costumes. Even though Halloween isn’t widely celebrated in France, apparently no one told these happy kids, parents and teachers. They were having a blast!

Cevennes Halloween Train

Anduze to Saint Jean du Gard

Cevennes Halloween Train

Waiting at the station

Cevennes Halloween Train

Cevennes Halloween Train

Cevennes Halloween Train

All aboard!

Cevennes Halloween Train

Cevennes Halloween Train

Cevennes Halloween Train

Smokey train car through the mountain pass

More on autumn in the Cevennes:

The Cevennes: Saint Jean du Gard

7 Great Ideas for An Awesome Autumn Weekend Around Uzes

An Autumn Week South of France

Cevennes Halloween Train

Happy Halloween!

 

Are you getting Barefoot Blogger posts by email?

Please sign up and enjoy each adventure with me!

local artists in Uzes

Village Scenes in Uzes: One Crazy Good Artist

Last Saturday afternoon one of the local artists in Uzes threw a soiree for a few friends and fans.

Aside from celebrating the last days of his art exhibit, it was a crazy good party.

local artists in Uzes

Artist dancing in the street

A Crazy Good Art Show

local artists in Uzes

Lemons

local artists in Uzes

“Rencontre Urbaine”

local artists in Uzes

local artists in Uzes

Le Mariage Pourtous

Good Food

local artists in Uzes

Fresh oysters and shrimp from the Saturday Market, pate, aubergine, saucisse (sausage), fromage (cheese) and pain (bread).

Funky Music

local artists in Uzes

New friends

local artists in Uzes

… and one crazy artist dancing in the street

local artists in Uzes

Francois Lewandrowski

This is how they do art shows in Uzes!

Wonder why I love it here???

Oh yes, almost forgot … and a piano tuner in the steet!

local artists in Uzes

Check out the artwork of  Francois Lewandrowski an other artist on Uzes: Village of Artists post.

10612963_754522537926654_2553256348184269299_n

SaveSave

Rain: The Aftermath

Rain: The Aftermath
Follow on Bloglovin

By now you know the south of France was hit by flooding in many towns and villages. In the center of historic Uzes, the biggest problem now is from water that leaked in through walls, windows and roofs. Villages below Uzes are still suffering from flood damage.

The event around Uzes was recorded by some amazing photography.  Several photos were given to me by friends who asked me to share them with you.

Moon over Uzes 10-09-2014

Moon over  Place du Duche, Uzes 10-08-2014

Storm clouds 10-09-2014

Storm clouds 10-09-2014

 

Flood waters outside Uzes

Flood waters outside Uzes

Roads either collapsed or lifted from the heavy flood waters.

Roads either collapsed or lifted from the heavy flood waters.

DSC_0800-001

Road outside Uzes 10-11-2014

Cars and trucks slid off the roads with torrential downpour

Cars and trucks slid off the roads with torrential downpour

 Remember the poultry farm outside Uzes? The one where Geoffrey and I picked up our Thanksgiving turkey last year? 

Here it is then….

Here it is now … 

Poultry farm outside Uzes after the flood

Poultry farm outside Uzes after the flood

The birds “flew the coop.” Literally. 

The day after the storm was cloudy and misty

The day after the storm was cloudy and misty

The night after the flood skie were still ominous

The night after the flood the skies were still ominous

Then the bad weather skies gave us a beautiful sunset

Then the bad weather skies gave us a beautiful sunset

Last night's sunset from my terrace

Last night’s sunset from my terrace

All is well.

Wine time at the Duchey

Wine time. Sea shells from South Carolina remind me of storms  from the past.

10171107_10153993963480717_2551941031588375243_n

Rain, Rain, Go Away

Rain, Rain, Go Away
Follow on Bloglovin

The last few days in Uzes have not been a lot of fun. Torrential rain has caused flooding and many nearby towns and villages have been hard hit.

Right now, Uzes is under an orange alert.

6245-1412933438_Fortunately the city of Uzes is on a hill, so even though we are close to the epicenter of a major storm, we have not been affected as much as others by the floods.

This is the fourth big storm in the region bringing more than two feet of rain since mid September. You may have heard that Montpelier had major damage from the first deluge.

The flooding is blamed on a stagnant weather pattern over Scotland, Ireland and the eastern Atlantic Ocean. It has caused more-than-normal amounts of moisture to flow into France.

Photos from some of the areas affected by this storm are pretty dramatic. Here are a few that I picked up from news sources and friends. 

My apartment

For me, the only damage in my apartment has been a bit of water — apparently from the windows in the guest room. The water must have seeped from under the windows into the electrical outlets. It caused a breaker switch to flip off — fortunately. Some overhead lights and a few other plugs in the apartment were affected, including where the refrigerator and internet are connected.  As you can see I “jerry-rigged” the refrigerator and internet with extension cords that connect to functioning outlets.IMG_3530

 

Electricians among you must be freaking out.

The problem has solved itself now. The electricity is back on, including the hot water tank!

 

 

Another storm is expected tomorrow that may be the worse yet.IMG_3532

The night of the biggest downpour I went out to the terrace several times to sweep away debris from a drain that empties water down the side of the building to the street below.

Today in the sunshine I cleaned the floor of the terrace with a scrub brush and swept away as much trash as I could find. If the water accumulate again, it might creep under the sliding glass door of the guest room.

I’m certain the terrace hasn’t been this clean in years.

 

The Duche

One thing I noticed while cleaning the terrace is the flagpole at the Duche.  The flag that flies on top of his tower indicates if the Duke is in town.

Apparently the Duke’s not at home.  I guess he’s left for higher ground …. perhaps to his apartment in Paris.

 

IMG_3534

The Palace of the Duche with no flag.

Saturday Market

Another coincidence of the stormy weather is that Saturday Market was nearly empty of vendors and shoppers. Where the streets and cafes are generally mobbed, this day was a different story.

 

Saturday Market in Uzes after the October flood

Saturday Market in Uzes after the October flood

 

Saturday Market cafes were open but few customers after the October flood

Saturday Market cafes were open but few customers after the October flood

 

 

A few shoppers wandered around the usually busy Saturday Market in Uzes

A few shoppers wandered around the usually busy Saturday Market in Uzes

 

Amazing photos

If anything good could be said about the stormy weather, the skies have been putting on a quite a show.

This photo was "borrowed" from a local news source and shows one of the powerful lightning strikes during the storm.

This photo was “borrowed” from a local news source and shows one of the powerful lightning strikes during the storm.

 

A view of the street without Saturday Market crowds and vendors.

A view of the street from my terrace showing  the street on  that is generally packed with shoppers and vendors

 

 

IMG_3536

 

 

The view from my living room window just prior to the first rain event

The view from my living room window just prior to the first rain event

 

If you note in the last photo, there are swarms of birds flying near the 11th century Tour Fenestrelle (“Window Tower”). It may be only me that thinks this, but the birds always seem to know when there’s a big change in the weather. Today they are unusually silent.

Perhaps the birds are resting up for what is ahead….. stay tuned.

 

10277585_713278118729336_141002025692858285_n

 

%d bloggers like this: